timothy chalamet beautiful boy

Toronto went peachy for Timothee Chalamet at Beautiful Boy

People went absolutely bonkers at the movie premiere of Beautiful Boy last night over the most beautiful-est boy of them all, actor Timothée Chalamet.

The 22-year old sauntered down the red carpet yesterday at the world premiere of his film, co-starring Steve Carell, in an embroidered black number while fans Called Him By His Name (get it). 

He took about a million selfies, and people brought just about everything for the young heartthrob to sign. 

Of course you have the standard books, posters, and at one point a shoe—you know, the usual. 

If you're wondering what he's holding in his hand, know that there were also a few food items being passed around too. 

One very, very excited fan also brought a cheeseburger for Timothée.

What she wanted him to do with it is unclear but her enthusiasm was palpable, and people could relate.

Some TIFF presenters brought him a peach — a nod to the infamous scene in Call Me By Your Name — which he signed and carried around for a bit before giving it to a lucky fan. 

Mr. Chamalet seemed to be enjoying all the Toronto love, at one point asking a fan "Is it bad that I like all this?" Swoon.

Toronto has been looking forward to seeing the talented young actor since he was spotted arriving at Pearson two days ago. 

Those who didn't get a chance to spot him at the Beautiful Boy premiere are already plotting the time and place to catch him before he leaves.

Lead photo by

TIFF


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