edibles canada

Canada introduces rules for weed edibles

Weed edibles and the rules around them just got clarified. 

Health Canada announced on Thursday that, after extensive consultations with law enforcement, health and safety experts, the federal government has come up with draft regulations governing "additional cannabis products" — namely "edible cannabis, cannabis extracts and cannabis topicals."

Cannabis-infused foods, lotions, sublingual strips, candies and other treats will be permitted for legal sale in Canada under the Cannabis Act "no later than" October 17, 2019.

This means that, if all goes as planned, you'll be able to celebrate the first anniversary of legalization (safely and with the approval of Justin Trudeau) while working up a nice, cookie-induced body buzz.

Of course, like smokeable pot, edible cannabis products will be highly regulated — which is important, given how much dosages can vary and cause confusion among inexperienced users.

"The Government of Canada's top priority is the health and safety of Canadians," said Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction (slash former City of Toronto police chief) Bill Blair on Thursday.

"By establishing a strict regulatory framework for these new cannabis products we are keeping profits away from criminals and organized crime. I encourage all interested Canadians to share their views on the proposed regulations."

Like the federal government's long-awaited air passenger bill of rights, announced on Monday, the draft regulations aren't yet available to read online.

They'll be published in full, however, on the government's own website this Saturday, December 22.

Consultations will be open for the next 60 days if you'd care to weigh in on the government's plan to legalize things like THC gummy bears and weed-infused beer.

The government is still seeking ideas and recommendations in regards to how much THC should be allowed in any product, how to control the quality of edibles, and rules surrounding the packaging and labelling of products that, in the past, have proven nearly indistinguishable from those marketed toward kids.

Lead photo by

Jesse Milns


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