the toronto zoo

The Toronto Zoo needs financial help to feed its animals while on lockdown

The Toronto Zoo has launched a new fundraising effort in order to raise money to feed its animals amid the COVID-19 closure

The zoo says the cost of food for the roughly 5,000 animals it houses is $1 million per year, normally funded by parking and admission revenues.

In light of this, the Toronto Zoo Wildlife Conservancy — established in 2019 to secure financial resources for the zoo's programs — has launched the Zoo Food for Life campaign to raise funds to offset these lost revenues.

"The Zoo’s priority during this closure is to ensure that the animals continue to receive the highest quality of care, while protecting the health and safety of our dedicated staff," said Dolf DeJong, CEO of the Toronto Zoo, in a statement.

The wildlife conservancy says it will be reaching out to the public over the coming weeks to highlight funding needs as well as the zoo's nutrition program. 

"The Wildlife Conservancy echoes the Toronto Zoo's commitment to caring for the animals, no matter what the situation," said Beth Gilhespy, executive directior of the Toronto Zoo Wildlife Conservancy, in a statement.

"We are focusing our fundraising efforts, with the help of our donors and the broader community, on the Zoo Food for Life campaign to support the animal nutrition program during this difficult time."

Lead photo by

The Toronto Zoo


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