Filmores Toronto closing

Iconic Toronto strip club Filmores says it won't be closing anytime soon

One of Toronto's oldest and most notorious strip clubs is hell-bent on staying in business, even if it means moving out the building it's been occupying for more than 40 years — as it undoubtedly will have to do.

Filmores Hotel and gentlemen's club, established in 1985, was recently deemed a goner after news broke that the prominent condo developer Menkes had purchased its historic home at 212 Dundas St. E. for $31.5 million.

This much is true: Menkes closed on the more than 100-year-old heritage building (and a parking lot next to it) in January.

Filmores has no intentions of shutting down, however, and plans to stay in its current home "for at least a couple more" years.

"Reports that Fimores is about to close are wrong," reads a message posted to the strip club's Facebook page on Saturday.

"Yes, the building we call home has been sold, but we've been here on the corner at 212 Dundas East for 40 years, and we'll be here for at least a couple more. And after that: STAY TUNED."

An image included with the post shows the venue's famous marquee, lit up with the message "Filmores open for business and not going anywhere soon!"

The club, which is attached to a modest hotel, has not yet specified what it plans to do once Menkes moves in (presumably to build a massive new development.)

"Filmores is planning a titillating future," is as far as the business will go on Facebook. "So please put your hands together for our next entertainer!"

Lead photo by

Neil Ta


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