bike lanes toronto

Toronto is fed up with dangerous and insufficient cycling infrastructure

This summer has been one filled with collision-related tragedies, and everyone in Toronto seems to be emphasizing the need for safer streets

The city has been pushing its Vision Zero plan as the solution, which aims to reduce traffic-related deaths and injuries to zero, but many are saying that'll never happen with the current state of cycling infrastructure in Toronto. 

Residents are pointing out how much of it seems to be falling apart, which inevitably increases danger for bikers. 

And many are arguing the need for separated cycling infrastructure, as bike lanes without physical barriers are better than no bike lane at all but still present a significant safety hazard. 

The city has argued that some streets with bus routes don't leave any space for additional bike lanes or barriers, but many have pointed out that other cities seem to manage both. 

And some are even sharing successful examples in other cities. 

Cyclists getting hit by open car doors while riding within a bike lane is routine at this point, and many residents are confused as to why there seems to be no will to do something about it. 

"Every stretch of road or sidewalk where a pedestrian or cyclist is injured or killed should be immediately assessed for physical safety upgrades. The fact that doesn't happen is a stunning exhibition of the pervasiveness of car culture and its acceptance of deadly consequence," one Twitter user wrote in a thread about cyclist safety

"Road narrowing. Curb radius tightening. Reduced pedestrian crossing distances. Protected bike lanes. Speed bumps. Metal bollards. Wider sidewalks. We know these things save lives, but they aren't being implemented at scale. A crisis of either leadership, ignorance, or both," he said

Despite public pressure, these safety issues persist on Toronto streets. 

And although a new study was just published stating that bike lanes are actually good for business, who knows when and if things will actually begin to change. 

Lead photo by

Brad Bradford


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