toronto city council

Pedestrian struck and killed while Toronto debated how to prevent pedestrian deaths

Toronto city councillors gathered today for the final meeting before summer break. One of the major agenda items was Vision Zer0 2.0, an updated safety project to reduce traffic-related deaths in the GTA. 

In a chilling coincidence, while that very project was being discussed in council, a pedestrian was struck and later died in hospital in North York. 

The pedestrian was struck at Cliffwood Rd. and Don Mills Rd., which is part of a stretch that Councillor Shelley Carroll said has been dangerous for a long time and requires a reduced speed limit. 

The woman was transported to hospital after the collision and was pronounced deceased shortly after. 

When the tragedy was brought up in council mid-meeting, Carroll got emotional. 

She moved a motion to prioritize reducing the speed limit on that the same stretch, on Don Mills Rd. between Duncan Mills and Steeles.

She requested it be prioritized in memoriam of the victim.

The original Vision Zero plan, implemented three years ago, failed to significantly reduce traffic-related deaths.

The second version of the plan would would reduce the speed limit on almost 50 streets across the GTA and require the implementation of numerous other road safety-related amendments.

In 2018, there were 66 pedestrian and cyclist deaths in the GTA.

Here's hoping that number only decreases.

Lead photo by

A Great Capture


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