911 tomato call

Someone called 911 to complain about a food order and it's as ridiculous as it sounds

If you thought calling 911 over the volume of an Amber Alert was the grossest waste of emergency resources possible, Peel Regional Police are once again here to prove you wrong with a truly ludicrous audio clip.

The force's official Twitter account published a now-viral video on Saturday in which a Toronto-area man can be heard calling 911 to complain tomatoes on his chicken sandwich.

"Hi, can you come to Queen Street?" asks the unidentified man at the top of the clip.

"Yes. The police? Or an ambulance? Or what are you asking for?" responds a 911 operator.

"Police, police, police," says the man. "I just want to talk to someone 'cause I've been threatened by an owner."

After determining that the man is a customer at a restaurant, the 911 operator asks to hear about the "threat."

The man then launches into a story about how he specifically told the restaurant's owner that he's allergic to tomatoes, but that he got tomatoes on his sandwich anyway. 

"At that time I was like... 'you know what? It happened last week where I ordered something and it was to go and I got tomatoes,' and I told him I can't eat tomatoes-"

The 911 operator, whose job it is to assist victims of such actual emergencies as fires, car crashes and violent assaults, cuts the man off mid sentence to completely own him.

"Ok, so, this has nothing to do with the police sir, ok sir? Much less 911," she interjects.

"Please don't call 911 in the future for fried chicken mishaps."

Peel Police, who've been running a 911 awareness campaign in and around Toronto all year, turned the operator's wasted time into a learning moment.

"A restaurant getting your order wrong is NOT an emergency," tweeted the force on Saturday. "A better way to deal with it would be to speak to the manager or call head office."

Peel police spokesman Const. Akhil Mooken confirmed that the call is real, and that its distribution is meant to educate members of the public.

"We want people to understand that 911 is meant to be used for life-threatening emergencies only where someone's own life or someone else's life is in danger, and not for disagreements with restaurants," he said.

"I spoke the other day about another call we received and, again, it had to do with a restaurant where someone called 911 because the restaurant didn't put their apple pies in their takeout bag. Definitely not a reason for 911."

Lead photo by

Peel Police Media


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