garrison crossing toronto

Toronto's first stainless steel bridge is finally about to open

Good news pedestrians and cyclists: the long-awaited Garrison Crossing is finally almost finished. 

The project, which has been years in the making, will allow those commuting through Liberty Village to cross the Kitchener rail corridor and the Lakeshore West rail corridor.

Both are railways that have long separated King and Queen West with almost everything south of Liberty Village.

The length of the bridge spans the same distance as five football fields.

It starts at Wellington Street, ends in Garrison Common in the Fort York grounds and will connect three parks — Ordnance Park, South Stanley Park and the Fort York Grounds.

CreateTO (the city's real estate agency managing the project) announced today that the grading of the new South Stanley Park extension is complete and the granular base for the trail in Ordnance Park is in the final stages.

They also announced that the paved stone landing from Garrison Common into the South Stanley Park extension is finished, the stainless steel barrier mesh has been installed, and soon the bike rail and wooden handrails will be too.

The installation of street furniture and signage, as well as the lighting on the bridges, has yet to be completed. 

Garrison Crossing is the only bridge in Canada made of stainless steel.

The project is set to be entirely completed by the end of the summer.

Lead photo by

Jeremy Gilbert


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