bike lane parking toronto

People keep parking in the bike lane in front of this Tim Hortons in Toronto

Parking in Toronto bike lanes is illegal (unless you're a taxicab, a school bus, or a disability-related vehicle) but it happens all the time.

But one city bike lane in particular has gained some notoriety as being less of a path for cyclists and more of a parking spot for drivers in need of caffeine. 

Thanks to a handy Tim Hortons situated on the corner, the southbound bike lane at the intersection of King and River streets has been bestowed with a new name by a Twitter user: the #RiverStreetCoffeeLane.

Since March, the user Jason Paris has committed to taking pictures of cars parked in the bike lane, and so far, there have been plenty. 

Sometimes it's just one car, sometimes it's two vehicles. Other times it's a hulking dump truck making a pitstop for a Double Double.

Public utility vehicles are actually allowed to park in bike lanes, but that's only if they're actively engaged in doing something related to their job.

Unfortunately, that doesn't include running to Timmies for their breakfast sandwich and some hash browns. That would be the life.

According to the City, the fine for illegal parking in a bike lane is $150. It seems like River Street Coffee Lane could be a viable business model for the City.

Or, you know, we could install more protected bike lanes, to ensure the safety of cyclists and drivers alike. 

Lead photo by

Jason Paris


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in City

Controversial cannabis chain rebrands all stores in Canada after backlash over Hobo name

Child at Toronto day camp tests positive for COVID-19

Toronto anti-maskers say Cherry Beach chainsaw guys destroyed their DJ booth

Here are all the new bike lanes built in Toronto since last summer and ones coming

Out-of-towners test positive for COVID-19 after visiting Muskoka resort and restaurant

NHL analyst calls the CN Tower the Space Needle and Toronto can't take it

Good Samaritan presents cheque to Mississauga T&T employees after racist tirade

The worst summer storms and floods in the history of Toronto