doug ford cuts

Ontario government announces plan to cap public sector wages

Doug Ford's PC government, as part of their unending quest to squash Ontario's $14.5 billion budget deficit, is now proposing legislation that would cap how much public servants are paid across the province.

"In Ontario, public sector compensation represents roughly half of all government expenditures, totaling over $72 billion annually," reads a news release issued by the province around 4 p.m. on Wednesday.

"By taking steps to ensure increases in public sector compensation reflect the fiscal reality of the province, the government is working to protect jobs, workers and vital services, now and as the government tackles Ontario's debt."

The proposed legislation, tabled today at Queen's Park, is called the Protecting a Sustainable Public Sector for Future Generations Act and will be subject to feedback from any interested parties all summer long.

If passed as written now, the act would limit public sector employee wage increases to 1 per cent per year for the next three years.

"The proposed legislative approach would not impose wage rollbacks, wage freezes or public sector job losses," writes the government itself.

"Additionally, Ontario's public sector employees would maintain eligibility for compensation increases and be able to negotiate terms and conditions."

Whatever happens, nothing is set to change at the legislative level until the fall, as the legislature rises for the summer on Thursday. Unless there's an emergency session over the summer, the bill can't become law until at least September 6.

Lead photo by

Michael Swan



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