Brad Ross TTC

Brad Ross is leaving the TTC

After 10 years as the face of Toronto's transit commission, longtime TTC spokesperson Brad Ross is moving on—to City Hall.

Ross announced in a message to employees on Wednesday morning that he would be leaving his role as the TTC's executive director of corporate communications on December 14 to serve as the City of Toronto's new chief communications officer.

"As a teenager growing up in Scarborough, my friends and I took the TTC everywhere. It was our connection to the city," wrote Ross in his message to employees.

"Not in a million years would I have dreamed of being the TTC’s Executive Director of Corporate and Customer Communications – I certainly wouldn't have had a clue what that even meant back then," he continued.

"I am proud of the TTC and will look back fondly at my time here. It’s a special place filled with good people."

Ross was known for his timely, straightforward approach to publicly addressing transit issues on an almost daily basis, as well as his badass tattoos.

A prolific social media user, he frequently responds to customers on Twitter, where he champions TTC initiatives, shares up-to-the-date information, and is sometimes also quite funny.

He'll surely be missed in his current role, but Torontonians can rest assured that they'll be hearing more from Ross in the future.

According to the city, Ross will officially assume his new role as Toronto's chief communications officer on January 7, 2019.

Lead photo by

City of Toronto


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