go train delays

15,000 people just got stuck on GO Trains heading to Toronto

More than 15,000 people found themselves delayed this morning by a GO train that got stuck on the tracks between Kitchener and Toronto, effectively blocking any other trains from using the route.

The problematic train was carrying equipment, according to Metrolinx spokesperson Anne Marie Aikins, and got caught on a broken switch just west of Malton Station before 6 a.m. on Wednesday.

The regional transit agency told The Star earlier today that commutes could take "anywhere from 20 to 40 minutes longer than usual," as trains needed to be re-routed through the Barrie corridor.

Customers aboard some of the delayed trains reported wait times of more than four hours, however.

Aikins said on Twitter around 7:30 a.m. that crews were working as fast as possible to repair the problem, but things were taking longer than expected.

The stuck train appears to have been moved, but customers on both GO and Via Rail trains were still reporting delays related to the incident as of 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday.

Fortunately for passengers affected, Metrolinx offers full refunds for all delays of 15 minutes or more (unlike some transit agencies...)

"Refunds are not automatic since passengers could take a different or an alternate route last minute," wrote GO Transit in response to one customer's query on Twitter. "Making a claim is easy, just fill in your trip and Presto details, here is the link."

Lead photo by

Edward Brain


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