Kodak building 9

Toronto's iconic Kodak Building 9 just made a big move

Toronto's historic Kodak 9 building, built in 1939 when film photography was still the rage, is now one significant step closer to becoming a transit hub.

But it wasn't without a ton of effort (3,000 tonnes, to be specific.)

As part of of construction on the new Eglinton Crosstown LRT line, Metrolinx picked up and moved the entire building about 200 feet from its original location last year.

She's moving! 8 inches per minute #Weston #Toronto #Metrolinx

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The goal was to preserve the abandoned structure so that it could be incorporated into the design of a new transit terminal called Mount Dennis Station, which will serve as a connection point between the LRT, the TTC, the GO Transit Kitchener line and UP Express.

It took workers just over a year to lay a new foundation for the station, but the relocation project has now come full term (which might come as disappointing news to urban explorers.)

On Nov. 13, the last remaining building from Toronto's Kodak Campus was returned to where it once stood at 3500 Eglinton Avenue West. Kodak 9 is now officially a structural component of the future Mount Dennis Station.

Here's what the second "big move" looked like, courtesy of the Eglinton Crosstown project.

The city-designated "Heritage Interest Building" is slated to become a secondary entrance for the new Mount Dennis transit hub, joined to the main entrance at Weston Road and Eglinton by a tunnel.

We won't get to experience any of this for ourselves, of course, until the Crosstown starts running in 2021.

Still, when it does open, Metrolinx promises that the former Kodak 9 building "will accommodate transit and non-transit related functions" and that it will "not require entrance into the fare paid area."

Lead photo by

The Crosstown


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