Urbane Map Toronto

New map charts Toronto neighbourhoods by stereotype

Toronto neighbourhood maps are nothing new. Ownership of Ork's Toronto map is virtually compulsory for young urban geeks, while Dave Murray's word cloud versions remain popular with the DIY fans. We even have a more practical set of offerings for those looking to get to know a given area. The new kid on the block, however, distinguishes itself by distilling Toronto's neighbourhood diversity into a set of humorous, if at times controversial, stereotypes.

Created by Urbane, a newish company that has compiled similar versions for New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles, the map retails for $19.99 at their online store. "Urbane is visiting our nice 'neighbours' to the North and created a map that attempts to simplify the incredible diversity that The Big T has to offer," the product description reads. "It's a city like no other, and deserves its own map."

Perhaps that should be a warning sign. If you're going to put together a map based on local stereotypes, it would surely help to rely on local knowledge. That said, it's not without a grin that one sees the Annex labeled as "professors in bay and gable housing," Yonge and Dundas as "Times Square, almost" and Roncesvalles as "tripping over toddlers." A number of the descriptors are spot on. While they certainly miss on a few — the western waterfront, for instance, is characterized as "all sorts of fun things" — in any endeavour of this sort a few of the jokes will fall flat. Also noteworthy is that the northern limit of the map is Bloor Street, which might speak to the hyper-downtown urbanite these are targeted at.

What do you think? Do the folks at Urbane get the parts of Toronto that they do map mostly right?


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