Jarvis Street Toronto

This is what Jarvis Street looked like from the 1890s to the 1960s

This is what Jarvis Street looked like from the 1890s to the 1960s

The measure of difference on Jarvis is something to behold, particularly because there remain just a few hints at what it all used to look like.

Prior to the 1940s, Jarvis Street was probably the most beautiful in all of Toronto, lined with the mansions of some of Toronto's wealthiest families.

And then, in 1947, the street was forever changed when many of its trees were ripped out to widen it for increased automobile traffic. While the project might have been necessary to accommodate a growing city, it's sad to think of what was lost in the process.

Here's what Jarvis Street has looked like through the years.

1890s

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St. Lawrence Market

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Old (old) City Hall

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Jarvis south from Carlton

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Horticultural Gardens (between Jarvis and Sherbourne)

1900s

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Jarvis in 1903

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The first Jarvis Collegiate

1910s

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Jarvis Street Baptist Church. Photo via the McCord Museum

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Allan Gardens Palm House

1920s

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Juvenile Court Building at 311 Jarvis

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The (then) new Jarvis Collegiate in 1924

1930s

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Jarvis and Maitland

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Jarvis and Carlton (northwest corner) 1931

1940s

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Jarvis and Carlton pre-street widening 1947

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Jarvis north of Carlton post-street widening 1947

1950s

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Jarvis north of Lombard Street

1960s

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Jarvis south of Bloor

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Jarvis and Queen (looking south)

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Jarvis and Queen (looking north)

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The birth of the Gardiner 1963


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