G20 protests

The 10 craziest things I saw at yesterday's protests

The G20 protests on Saturday were completely chaotic at times, and trying to keep up with what was happening seemed nearly impossible. The official march began at Queen's Park and proceeded southbound on University Ave., eventually turning west on Queen. But once the march hit Spadina, confusion spread, several groups splintered off and the destruction and vandalism began.

Other than the burning police cars, and vandalized store fronts, TTC vehicles and cars, here are some of the most odd and/or wild things I saw (and smelled) on Saturday.

G20 destruction Toronto

  • The stench of vinegar soaked face masks everywhere, used by protesters to deal with tear gas.

  • Feces smeared on the front display of an American Apparel store on Yonge.

  • Protesters trying to give riot police lap dances (lead photo).
G20 Protest

  • A little girl on her father's shoulders in the middle of the G20 protest madness.

  • Blood stained bandages and people lying on Queen Street.

  • Police drumming their shields aggressively as they approached protesters.

G20 protest

  • Fresh sod used to craft makeshift anti-G20 signs.

  • Protesters casually enjoying a meal and watching the madness from the comfort of a restaurant on Queen.

  • Fist-fights between fellow protesters.

G20 protest sign

  • And, to generalize, the city of Toronto turned into a veritable war-zone.

G20 ProtestsG20 Protests toronto

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