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House of the Week: 1870 Lake Shore Blvd. E

Posted by Leslie Bank / February 25, 2014

Toronto house 1870 Lake Shore Blvd E1870 Lake Shore Boulevard E is one of the Painted Lady-style houses in the Beaches sitting directly across from Ashbridges Bay. The house would make an excellent compromise for someone nursing an itch to swap slushy, grey TO for coastal, colourful San Francisco -- but don't get too excited. This place managed to sell just days after listing, thanks in part to a frantic pre-spring real estate market. Kudos to that buyer for choosing to pull the trigger early. To everyone else, consider this blue and yellow lady the one that got away.

There are several of these brightly-coloured houses running along Lake Shore Blvd E, but #1870 is one of only a handful that look out directly onto the lake. While the view is enviable, the traffic and noise produced on this busy road might not be ideal. Parking is no issue, though -- there's lane access to a detached private garage with space for two cars and a hydraulic lift. The house is easily walkable to the Beaches neighbourhood, Martin Goodman Trail and the boardwalk are seconds away, and high-ranked Kew Beach Junior Public School is just a block over.

On the inside, you won't find the "Full House" set (how rude) but you will find high vaulted ceilings, a spacious kitchen and fresh hardwood floors. The contemporary aesthetic won't appeal to everyone but the house has good flow and is designed with family living in mind. There are more bathrooms (5) than bedrooms (4), and all of the windows are oversized to bring in natural light and waterfront breezes.

House of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd ESPECS:

  • Address: 1870 Lake Shore Blvd. E
  • Price: $1,115,000 (sold)
  • Bedrooms: 3 + 1
  • Bathrooms: 5
  • Storeys: 3
  • Parking Spaces: 2 spaces in detached garage, with space for 1 additional car
  • Taxes: $6,138
  • Walk Score: 82

House of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd ENOTABLE FEATURES

  • large eat-in kitchen with granite countertops
  • view of Lake Ontario from 3rd storey balcony
  • upper-floor laundry room

House of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EGOOD FOR

The person who bought this place was likely looking for modern style, spacious rooms and a pretty special East End location. Although the house has an architectural, Victorian look from the street, on the inside it contains all the hallmarks of contemporary living. These houses don't enter the market too often, so it's worth it to act fast when one does.

House of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EMOVE ON IF
The cookie cutter drops like a knife. You want something unique. Head east, there you'll find the cottage of your dreams, and, you know, lake water lapping.

MORE PHOTOSHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd EHouse of the Week 1870 Lake Shore Blvd E

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Discussion

83 Comments

Chrism / February 25, 2014 at 08:24 am
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Seriously, living here is living on a major four lane street - high car and truck traffic ALL the time. What good is having large winbdows "to catch the lake breeze" if you can't open them becauise you aren't able to hear yourself think, let alone have a conversation? Oh, and yeah, contrary to above, these houses are on the market ALL THE TIME! Just wait a few weeks and there'll be another.
Rick / February 25, 2014 at 08:25 am
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I knew somebody that lived in these townhomes, and can say that its a real nice area to live in, and the home was very comfortable living space as well. And I thought this was priced very well too. Is that what it sold for?
Crazy prices Toronto / February 25, 2014 at 09:09 am
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Anticipated Story:
Listed at 1.11 mill,Biding war, Sold for 1.8 Mill
Adam / February 25, 2014 at 09:19 am
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This is right around the corner from me and it always was one of my favourite houses. I pass it on the way to work every day. Very beautiful paint job on the exterior. Didn't know the inside was so gorgeous.
aksing fer a freng / February 25, 2014 at 09:26 am
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How many times has this house's basement flooded?
Rick replying to a comment from Crazy prices Toronto / February 25, 2014 at 09:46 am
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Holy crap, that is ridiculous, like difference in the price would be a 2500-3000 sqft home in a real nice part of Mississauga.
Absolutely retarded.
LB / February 25, 2014 at 09:49 am
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Some extra info: it sold in 2 days for 100% of list price. And it's approx. 3500 sq-ft.
Moneesh replying to a comment from Rick / February 25, 2014 at 10:23 am
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But then you'd have to live in Mississauga.
easy replying to a comment from Rick / February 25, 2014 at 11:04 am
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Ummmm...ok.

Sorry, i've Googled Maps the hell out of the internet and i have yet to get any search results that would back up your theory of a "real nice part of Mississauga".
Mike / February 25, 2014 at 11:16 am
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I honestly do not understand who is buying these homes. My gf and mine's combined income is something like 130K a year and I still don't believe we can afford this home anytime soon. I guess being new to this city I don't know many people who actually own homes here, but are many of them 30+?? holy mackinaw
basic math replying to a comment from Mike / February 25, 2014 at 11:33 am
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How can you not afford a decently priced place, say 800K+ ?

Did you not save anything growing up?
What are you spending all your money on now?

Wife and i are 35, both with nice jobs, combined 120-130K.
Both saved well from an early age and recently bought an 805K house. Our mortgage is slightly over 200K. Which is by no means onerous what so ever. We are still capable of doing everything we want...travel, dining, etc.

So this isnt about houses being too expensive (yes some very well are, but its subjective). This is about people who do not know to to save. Thats the bottom line.
jim / February 25, 2014 at 12:08 pm
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Who can afford these houses?

-people with high incomes. Lots of folks in this city make >100K. Lot's of them have partners that do as well.
-many people got into the condo market 5-10 years ago and have taken a large amount of money out their condo sales (I know a few people that bought pre-construction in King West back in the mid 2000's and took over $200k out of their condo sales - nice down-payment there).
-many folks save their money instead of blowing it on designer clothes, expensive car leases, $5.00 coffees, ect.

john replying to a comment from jim / February 25, 2014 at 01:04 pm
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Jim is right.....
YOU CAN AFFORD TO BUY A HOUSE....stop buying the $5.00 coffees, eating out at the latest grilled cheese place, or going to a fancy butcher shop.
Go to a local regular butcher, home cooking works, and what is wrong with making a coffee at home or just buying one at Tim Hortons????Please all these complainers.
Even at a combined income of $80k its possible....check MLS lots of good homes for $350k.
Bunch of complainers.....don't buy beer for a few months, quit smoking, do you really need the latest Apple phone ....etc etc....its all possible.
john / February 25, 2014 at 01:09 pm
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bunch of complainers......made me mad
CaligulaJones / February 25, 2014 at 01:13 pm
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"waterfront breezes"

Yeah. Careful of the "shit stack" a few blocks away if there is a waterfront breeze from the west...
ehbee / February 25, 2014 at 02:14 pm
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these places are gorgeous but have some significant downsides - basement flooding - noise from the road - noise from neighbours (you can hear people sneeze three units over - when there is a gap in traffic noise) ... but they have the classic requirement location location location
Mike / February 25, 2014 at 02:19 pm
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For the quality of the interior, the style and most importantly the location, it's worth the $1.1M that it sold for.

And about the comment of no really nice places in Mississauga, just go anywhere along Mississauga Rd south of Dundas on MLS. I didn't say it was affordable though. haha
Kumar O'Reilly / February 25, 2014 at 02:34 pm
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Loving the comments from these self-righteous jackasses about how people can't afford houses because of bad lifestyle decisions. Keep it coming. When all the boomers try and cash out en masse to fund their retirements while at the same time these shoddily-constructed one-bedroom condo coffins are becoming slums, you'll be laughing out of the other side of your smug faces.
iliveattheverve / February 25, 2014 at 02:43 pm
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all the tile in this house is atrocious - and some of the hardwood, too. also, I hate the way everyone thinks that putting moulding on bookcases makes them look taller, more expensive, and custom. that being said, I still like this house. and good staging.
James replying to a comment from john / February 25, 2014 at 02:59 pm
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Holy arrogant blind privilege. And I thought the growing gap between the rich and the poor was a bit of a myth. The majority do not struggle to be able to enter the Toronto housing market because of $5 lattes. If you really think that bad money management alone is what separates the haves from the have nots in this city, you are without question, one giant asshole.
Randy / February 25, 2014 at 03:08 pm
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Housing bubble.
do tell replying to a comment from James / February 25, 2014 at 03:09 pm
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Then whats your reason as to why so many people complain they cant afford to buy some property?

Either people saved and spent wisely. Or they didnt.

Mappy replying to a comment from Mike / February 25, 2014 at 03:11 pm
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Fair enough. There is one stretch of "nice" Mississauga.


The other 99.3% of the region is a wasteland.
toobad replying to a comment from Randy / February 25, 2014 at 03:14 pm
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...only affects those who cant afford what they've bought.

Save wise, spend wise.
CaligulaJones replying to a comment from Mappy / February 25, 2014 at 03:16 pm
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Well, Port Credit is nice, too...
Todd replying to a comment from do tell / February 25, 2014 at 03:16 pm
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Or they were born in a generation that had more opportunity.

There isn't a home owning boomer alive that would trade places with a 25-year-old recent grad for a chance to start over. They know this generation's fucked... the good ones understand their role in this mess, the bad ones tell this generation it's because they didn't work hard.
Todd replying to a comment from basic math / February 25, 2014 at 03:20 pm
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I call bullshit on you and your wife saving $600K by age 35.

If any of that is true, it's because you have rich parents (and you'll ignore this advantage, by saying it's purely your haaaaaaard work that got you there) and you leeched off them well into your adulthood.

Lee / February 25, 2014 at 03:22 pm
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John if you can find me a place in Toronto for $350k let me know please. It is pretty much impossible to find anything under $500k these days.
Happy home owner replying to a comment from James / February 25, 2014 at 03:24 pm
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James many people are "poor" because they make poor choices. If your household is making 100k then you can easily afford a house in TO. John is right. The best advice is to pay yourself first. Don't pay Kumphert and Kim first or any other of those gimmick places at FCP. If you're spending more than 2 dollars a day on coffee and more than 10 dollars on lunch for yourself then you have yourself to blame.
Happy home owner replying to a comment from Kumar O'Reilly / February 25, 2014 at 03:24 pm
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It is not a one bedroom. Did you read the article?
reaching replying to a comment from Todd / February 25, 2014 at 03:28 pm
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Opportunity is there for everyone, every generation.

Mappy replying to a comment from CaligulaJones / February 25, 2014 at 03:30 pm
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That was considered in the "nice stretch", as down to Lakeshore from Mississauag Rd you'd get to PC.

So that one little quadrant can be deemed nice.

Rest, just about everything that is awful about Suburbia.
basic math replying to a comment from Todd / February 25, 2014 at 03:40 pm
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Neither.

Bought first property in 20's. Sold it as King West was starting to trend upwards. Made profit.
Bought new place in Leslieville as it was trending, sold it and made profit.

Bought current house. Low mortgage due to saving early, spending wisely.
Todd replying to a comment from reaching / February 25, 2014 at 03:40 pm
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Not 1950s and 1960s opportunity, not even close.
Todd replying to a comment from basic math / February 25, 2014 at 03:42 pm
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Yeah, bullshit.

Your mom was doing your laundry until you found a woman to do it for you.
Happy home owner replying to a comment from Todd / February 25, 2014 at 03:45 pm
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Young adults nowadays have no clue on how to save money. They have no understanding of "starter home".
James replying to a comment from do tell / February 25, 2014 at 03:48 pm
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Of course, the poor are obviously poor because of bad money management. Stupid poor people. My apologies.
Todd / February 25, 2014 at 03:49 pm
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You basically leeched off your parents until you went out on your own sometime in your twenties, never paid rent, bought a condo in a market that wasn't oversaturated, became a speculator who artificially raises home value, and then gloats about it becoming unaffordable to others. Look at the barrier of entry in King West circa 2000... compare it to today. Look at the middle of the market. Look at the heft at the bottom. You got in at a good time and that's it. You're not special, you're not creative, you're not hard-working... the foot in the door was placed there by timing and luck. You're not a unique special snowflake who found the key to success that those who find the market unsustainable are not able to find.

Hey, I'm in a good position too, but at least I can see the fucking forest.
Todd replying to a comment from Happy home owner / February 25, 2014 at 03:51 pm
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Old fogies today are so ignorant or plain-ass dumb that they can't realize their coming of age during boom times is the reason for their success.
basic math replying to a comment from Todd / February 25, 2014 at 03:52 pm
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You're reaching now Toddy.

Ouch replying to a comment from Todd / February 25, 2014 at 04:00 pm
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Bitter much?

Heaven forbid someone did something, anything, to make some money and understand what their end game was.

If it got "basic math" to a better place, in good financial standing, who are you to say anything about it?

That's called being smart with your money, regardless of what you think.


basic math replying to a comment from Todd / February 25, 2014 at 04:02 pm
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Never once said i was special.

Simply said that is how i got to my current position.

No leeching, paid for rent, paid for school myself.

Anything is possible if you're smart about it.
James replying to a comment from Happy home owner / February 25, 2014 at 04:13 pm
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Wow. Astonishing. You have no clue how many professionals have to pay off student debt well into their 30s, some as late as their 40s. True they didn't have to borrow tens of thousands, but they kind of did in order to get on a career track early enough so they wouldn't have to deal with fighting ageist stereotypes that prevent people from getting in the door. Saving, getting a degree, saving again, getting another degree, and often saving a third time to get the kind of education necessary to get the job that allows you to make the $100K you're talking about, takes a good 10 to 15 years. There's also the first few years of your career development, and that better be progressive or you'll be making significantly less than six figures for a long time. Of course, this is saying absolutely nothing about those who have massive socioeconomic obstacles to overcome just to survive in Toronto, let alone consider buying the smallest of condos. Listen, I'm not complaining about my road through life. I'm grateful I had access to the loans that have allowed me to get to the lucky place I am now, but please, please, fucking please don't tell me or anyone else that the difference between entering the Toronto housing market is money management skills.
Happy home owner replying to a comment from Todd / February 25, 2014 at 04:17 pm
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I'm in my early 30s. Excuse me for saving money. Jealous?
Happy home owner replying to a comment from James / February 25, 2014 at 04:18 pm
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You should have thought about that before dropping 10s of thousands on some arts degree that would never get you a real job.
dogwalker / February 25, 2014 at 04:19 pm
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I walk my dog in this area, over at Woodbine Beach and Ashbridges Bay, and the smell from the waste plant is so overwhelming on some days, I feel so sorry for the folks who live in the area.
James replying to a comment from Happy home owner / February 25, 2014 at 04:31 pm
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If people had to wear their opinions around their neck when they walked into my practice, I'd be facing a number of malpractice suits.
CaligulaJones replying to a comment from James / February 25, 2014 at 04:35 pm
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"don't tell me or anyone else that the difference between entering the Toronto housing market is money management skills."

kinda doesn't jive with:

"True they didn't have to borrow tens of thousands"

No shit. My money management skills consisted of going to community college, reading every manual I could get on how to run things, then becoming invaluable to every place I've worked by learning everything about where I worked.

There, I hoped I saved someone a large debt. Hate to see a 22 year old pay for things "into their 40s". Geeze.
CaligulaJones replying to a comment from Mappy / February 25, 2014 at 04:38 pm
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You're right. I lived in Port Credit, before it yuppified, but it was still nice. Then we moved to Bloor Street in Mississauga. Then, I quickly broke up with her and moved out.

I think they use the .jpg of that stretch of 'sauga for the illustration for "soul destroying".
CaligulaJones replying to a comment from dogwalker / February 25, 2014 at 04:39 pm
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Not to mention the parade of wasted teenagers (and others, don't want to be ageist) during "graduation season".
stopitman replying to a comment from easy / February 25, 2014 at 05:16 pm
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@easy - the only nice part of Mississauga is Port Credit and Lakeshore areas (parts that existed before Mississauga existed), especially along Hurontario (south of the QEW) and Mississauga Road (also south of QEW/Dundas). Otherwise you're wasting your money if you spend that much in the 'saug.
Another home owner / February 25, 2014 at 05:19 pm
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I'm in my mid thirties and bought my first home in leslieville when I was 27. I graduated with a 40k loan but was lucky to be able to live with my parents to pay it off faster. Not everyone is lucky enough to be able to live with their parents but there are also some who can but prefer not to. I was lucky to get into the market at a great time but it also required a lot if sacrifices and being smart with my money. I had roommates for five years and still drive a 15 year old car. It takes both smarts, sacrifice and luck.
basic math replying to a comment from Another home owner / February 25, 2014 at 05:27 pm
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Not according to Todd.

To him everyone has a silver spoon in their mouth and doesn't know the first thing about saving, spending wisely, having a plan, etc.
Wah / February 25, 2014 at 05:44 pm
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Trolls
cathie replying to a comment from Lee / February 25, 2014 at 06:11 pm
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Go to mls.ca and check out the numerous homes that are listed in the east end/danforth/east york area of Toronto that are well under 500K.
The comments about the $5 coffees, the $10 lunches, bar-hopping weekends and the need for every new gizmo that comes on the market are bang on. These amounts add up. Changing your lifestyle and living a more frugal life will go a long way towards your goal of home ownership. The problem is most people don't have the self-disciple to buckle down and live a more scaled back life.
Also, be aware that almost 50% of homebuyers in Toronto do so with the help of family. They're not doing it on their own.
Bright side / February 25, 2014 at 06:14 pm
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Yes, the neighborhood can e a little stinky on certain days, but worth it to live by the beach. Plus they are working to fix the odor problem. http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=b7e807ceb6f8e310VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD&;vgnextchannel=0db7f75e4f18f310VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD&vgnextfmt=default
Happy home owner replying to a comment from Another home owner / February 25, 2014 at 06:27 pm
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So very well said. If living with your parents is not an option then renting cheap can help. I rented basement apartments in far flung areas of the city to save money. I bought second hand furniture. I shopped at No Frills when I would have rather preferred to go to Metro. According to Todd I was born with a silver spoon.
Chris replying to a comment from CaligulaJones / February 25, 2014 at 06:43 pm
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The opposing breeze brings it nicely toward Distillery District!
Samuel / February 25, 2014 at 07:11 pm
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Wow. There are a lot of complete assholes commenting on this article. Very sad.
SLM / February 25, 2014 at 07:32 pm
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PEOPLE NEED TO SHUT THE FUCK UP!!
John replying to a comment from SLM / February 25, 2014 at 07:53 pm
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So true...
John replying to a comment from James / February 25, 2014 at 08:01 pm
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Privilege? Dude my immigrant parents worked hard in factories and still do.... I saved from the beginning every penny, never needed school loan since I went to college, got a job with a company paid university tuition....both a house north of st.clair away from all these yuppies for $360k....10 yrs ago...worked and saved to pay mortgage off....fool it's about priorities...many many people maybe poor but they work hard and still can buy house and set their kids off in a better direction, just like my parents did.....
John replying to a comment from Lee / February 25, 2014 at 08:06 pm
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Check out mls....when I say toronto I mean all of toronto not just south of bloor.
Tommy boy replying to a comment from Another home owner / February 25, 2014 at 08:08 pm
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Key words...sacrifice and being smart.....
Prospect / February 25, 2014 at 09:44 pm
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Anyone who is commenting on this article with their ignorant and idealistic views" you can afford a 500k+ home if you stop buying coffees"- ha! Needs to give their head a serious shake. As a prospective first time home buyer in their late twenties who has lived at home rent free- working full time for the last 5 years making an income of 100k average yearly, to save a nest egg of 100k living by no means an extravagant life- I am actually quite frugal. I am finding it pretty well impossible to purchase or get approved by the banks for that matter (perfect credit history) and afford to buy anything decent in the city. This is a beautiful home in a great area but over 1M- common!? This housing bubble we are in is ridiculous, unsustainable, and out of reach for the vast majority of young working adults such as myself. So perhaps do a bit of research, and speak to those trying to enter the market before throwing around ridiculous antiquated idea that savings will make the housing market attainable. You are being blind to every other economic factor and the reality of the 2014 Toronto housing market.
Paddle / February 25, 2014 at 09:55 pm
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I live nearby, no flooding in the newer developments for the past 12 years. The new houses have sub pumps and good drainage. They do occur on Kew beach ave. and older houses.

For noise, these houses were made with good sound proofing and insulation. I'm right beside the window on Lakeshore and don't hear a thing.

During the summer I turn off my AC and catch the lake breeze. No smell. There maybe a smell near the Loblaws near Leslie.
Rick replying to a comment from Prospect / February 25, 2014 at 10:19 pm
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I agree with you 100%, but news flash there is a world outside Toronto - Mississauga, Brampton, Vaughan, Oakville, Pickering ect... all with affordable options at this current time, sorry you'll might have to drive in a car or take public transit to get to work but, perhaps you, I dont know - SUCK IT UP?!?!?!?

Toronto is for idiots, brutal traffic, the worst transit, idiots on bikes all over the place, small living spaces, and condo's that are not an investment whatsoever during these times of the condofication of Toronto - Who in the hell needs that??

Matt replying to a comment from aksing fer a freng / February 25, 2014 at 10:40 pm
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This house's basement has probably never flooded. This subdivision was built in the 90s and thanks to wonderful developments in engineering design since the 1930's there are actually separate sewers for sanitary and storm. Imagine! There's also something called stormwater management.
Mike replying to a comment from basic math / February 26, 2014 at 12:16 am
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I just got around to reading all of the responses in this article-looks like I touched some nerves. We both do save, and we have 50K set aside for a downpayment, but I am the only one paying back 40G schooling debt. We are 26 and 25...so maybe when we are 10 years down the road and your age, we will be in the same position. I guess I will have to lay off the starbucks (I don't drink coffee) iphones(I own a standard BB), designer clothes (I am a big fan of Old Navy clothes)and whatever else you assumed I was blowing money on. Your huge advantage was graduating and working when the market was surging and still affordable. Apples to Oranges between you and I. But come to think of it, we are at a combined income of you and yours 10 years before you, so I am sure we'll be alright.
James / February 26, 2014 at 12:53 am
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Dope spot if its in your price range!
Maybe replying to a comment from Mike / February 26, 2014 at 07:15 am
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Here's hoping, kiddo.

Just don't get sucked into the lifestyle you see from majority of 20 something's.

Think about the lifestyle you need.
Another home owner / February 26, 2014 at 08:39 am
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Prospect, if you've lived rent free and made over 100k the last five years and have only been able to save 100k, then sorry, you dont even know what frugal is.
SUP replying to a comment from Chrism / February 26, 2014 at 12:26 pm
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I live a few houses over. These houses seldom come up for sale.

Lakeshore is busy but the all the new development are sound proofed. I open my windows every chance I get.
Alex / February 26, 2014 at 02:42 pm
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So by a few people's logic on here people shouldn't bother getting an Arts degree at university because it's a waste of time and money. So instead they should...? All the professional programs already take in the max number of students, the trades can only absorb so many extra apprentices, and college can only absorb so many as well. Lots of people go to Uni knowing their degree isn't a guarantee of a job, but knowing that applying without a Uni degree is a guarantee of NOT getting a job.

It doesn't help that the previous generation outsourced all of our jobs (by being "frugal" and buying cheap foreign made crap from wal-mart, etc). Also, they refuse to retire because they didn't save up enough money so we have to compete with people with 20+ years of experience. Thanks for ruining the environment too, you guys are great. Oh, I almost forgot that you refuse to build or maintain any infrastructure, won't pay taxes so education costs 10 times what it did in your day, and won't raise min wage so the jobs that you had as teenagers that used to pay for a car and university now will barely pay for the transit to and from school for current teenagers. The last few decades were the worst, most selfish generation there ever was and I can't wait till we can kick them out of power and start fixing their mess. I'm incredibly fortunate to have a good well-paying job with benefits, and although I worked really hard to be able to get through the professional university program I did and graduate without debt, I know that I'm lucky to be where I am.
CaligulaJones replying to a comment from Alex / February 26, 2014 at 02:57 pm
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Thanks for proving "Boom, Bust and Echo" so clearly...
markus / February 26, 2014 at 03:22 pm
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I live in these houses, they are fabulous, this house sold way under value. I have a BA in Arts, and purchased the house when I was 25 years old back when they were $600,000. Its now doubled and is an amazing location. The only negative is all the immigrants who come down to the beach and treat it like crap on summer weekends and leave their garbage everywhere.
Happy home owner replying to a comment from Alex / February 26, 2014 at 05:01 pm
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"the trades can only absorb so many extra apprentices". Then why are companies going to Ireland to recruit thousands of skilled trade workers?
everyone knows why replying to a comment from Happy home owner / February 26, 2014 at 05:46 pm
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Well thats obvious, us Irish are the best!
Happy home owner replying to a comment from everyone knows why / February 26, 2014 at 07:01 pm
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Just the few hours a day when you're sober.
Home truths replying to a comment from Happy home owner / February 28, 2014 at 02:42 pm
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From what I see in TO,those younger couples around 35 age range and under who are buying these hefty priced homes are all getting a massive helping hand from the parents in the form of cash injection. The parents are not keeping their savings in the bank or anywhere else for a 1% interest rate for 5 years. How else can younger people afford to buy a house of TO prices and then move in and tear it down and rebuild. Developers are also buying up all the houses with views to renting out for now and later tearing down to build a million dollar mid rise boutique condo for the Empty nesters. Just look around you.
Alex replying to a comment from Happy home owner / February 28, 2014 at 05:05 pm
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That's why I said "only so many" and not "none" :P Can you please cite where you got the info that companies are recruiting thousands of apprentices for skilled trades from Ireland and bringing them here and paying them as much as they would pay a native apprentice? I wasn't aware of this happening, and I'm really curious why they chose Ireland in particular. Luck of the Irish, eh? Or bad luck in this case I guess, since it's probably related to their economy going belly-up.
osiem@hotmail.com / March 1, 2014 at 01:24 am
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See above: Irish are the best. Ever.
Another whiner / March 1, 2014 at 09:48 am
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Wah! I can't afford a house! Wah!! Other people can! Wah! I don't get everything I want! Wah!! Wah!!Wah!!

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