Sunday, February 1, 2015Cloudy -3°C
City

A 1900s Toronto photo extravaganza

Posted by Chris Bateman / January 31, 2015

toronto 1910sIn the 1900s, Toronto burned. On the night of April 19, 1904, a small fire broke out in a necktie factory near the northwest corner of Wellington and Bay, lighting up the chilly April night. Thanks to a stiff southeasterly wind, within a few hours the blaze had penetrated south of Front St. Many of the wholesale stores and factories that dominated the area were completely gutted. Many collapsed into the street or in on themselves in great thunderous crashes.

By morning, 20 acres of downtown was a smouldering wreck. 5,000 workers were put out of work, some permanently. Total losses were estimated at $10 million--somewhere upward of $200 million in today's money. The photos above and below were taken from roughly the same location on Bay St. about a year apart.

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City

Watch Ryerson's newest building rise at hyper speed

Posted by Derek Flack / January 30, 2015

ryerson student centreIt's been almost five years since the last remains of Sam the Record Man were removed from the corner of Yonge and Gould. In the time that's intervened, Ryerson's bright and shiny Student Learning Centre has risen from the ashes. It was difficult to get excited about the building in the immediate aftermath of Sam's demise, but now that it's almost set to open and the iconic record shop sign has finally found a home, it's possible to step back and appreciate this new addition to Yonge St.

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City

Toronto ranked the best city to live in the world

Posted by Derek Flack / January 29, 2015

toronto safest cityToronto has been ranked the best city to live in the world by the Economist. The ranking aggregates Toronto's performance across a range of indexes, which include safety, livability and cost of living. National level rankings like the Economist's Democracy and Global Food Security Index were also factored into the overall rank. So, like, we're the best. Give yourself a pat on the back.

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City

Province considers lowering speed limits in Toronto

Posted by Derek Flack / January 29, 2015

speed limit torontoThe provincial government is looking into the reduction of speed limits in Toronto and other cities across Ontario in a bid to improve safety for pedestrians and cylists. The default speed limit in Toronto and other municipalities is 50kph, but there's been pressure to lower this number for years. A 2010 report from the Chief Coroner requested that municipalities have the option to reduce the default speed limit to 40kph, which allows a car to stop roughly five metres quicker than one traveling 10 kilometres faster (8 metres vs. 13).

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City

Home for sex trafficking victims to open in Toronto

Posted by Natalia Manzocco / January 29, 2015

covenant houseClose on the heels of the announcement that the city will open more shelter beds for women and LGBTQ youth, another at-risk population is about to receive a boost in resources. Covenant House has announced that they will be opening a new facility geared specifically toward rehabilitating victims of sex trafficking.

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City

10 key Toronto intersections as they were 100 years ago

Posted by Chris Bateman / January 28, 2015

toronto yonge queen100 years is a long time for a Toronto intersection to evolve. Streets get widened, buildings get knocked down, and in many cases rural idyll is replaced by urban hustle. For some of these 10 intersections, the changes have been profound (Bayview and Eglinton is barely recognizable,) but others remain familiar. At Queen and Yonge (above,) many of the buildings present in 1910 are still standing. In fact, the east side of the street remains largely unchanged. If it wasn't for construction of the Eaton Centre and the loss of the Yonge streetcars, the photo would likely be very similar today.

Here's a look at 10 key Toronto intersections as they were 100 years ago.

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