Thursday, October 23, 2014Partly Cloudy 8°C
City

10 quirky things to know about Etobicoke

Posted by Chris Bateman / October 22, 2014

EtobicokeModern day Etobicoke, like the City of Toronto, is a relatively recent construction. Once a disparate collection of small towns and villages, the current city is a suburban spread of high-rise apartments, leafy residential streets, and tough-looking industrial zones.

Toronto's western neighbourhoods are also home to numerous tantalizing curiosities, including remnants of a lost village absorbed and almost erased by the encroachment of modern industry, a massive and ornate Hindu temple, a pioneer cemetery landlocked by highway ramps, and a tiny fragment of a cancelled light rail line at Kipling station.

Here are 10 quirky things to know about Etobicoke.

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City

Is this the transit plan that Toronto desperately needs?

Posted by Derek Flack / October 22, 2014

Ari Goldkind Transit PlanIf you've felt underwhelmed by the transit plans of our leading mayoral candidates, you might be taken with this soaring vision from Ari Goldkind. At first glance it seems like just another fantasy map, but a little digging through the accompanying 21-page document reveals that the long shot mayoral candidate has also put together a funding plan. It's wildly ambitious, of course, but that might be a dose of just what Toronto needs to break its complacency when it comes to transit expansion.

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City

John Tory carries wide lead as election nears

Posted by Derek Flack / October 22, 2014

John Tory pollIf there was any doubt that John Tory is the favourite heading into the municipal election, the latest numbers from Forum Research should put that to rest. The same company that put Tory and Doug Ford neck and neck two weeks ago, now has the mayoral candidates separated by 14 points with less than a week to go before the election.

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City

House of the Week: 118A Robinson Street

Posted by Isabel Ritchie / October 21, 2014

118A Robinson Street TorontoJust one block from Trinity Bellwoods Park, this cute semi-detached located at 118A Robinson St. offers a pretty good picture of what you can buy with $650K in Toronto these days. The curb appeal won't blow you away, but the bones of this house are solid. Wide plank hardwood floors cover the first floor, and the open concept design is highlighted by the unique entrance to the dining area. No cookie cutter design here.

Though the lot is narrow (less than 12 feet!), there's room for more than a couple here. With three bedrooms plus a nursery (or an office), the house is deceptively large. It could, however, obviously use a reno. That kitchen probably isn't where you'd imagine cooking your dream meal, and the parquet flooring on the second level is just tired. Dump some money into this one and remain for a few years, and you'll be selling it for way more than it's listed at now.

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City

Why doesn't the TTC run trains marked with graffiti?

Posted by Chris Bateman / October 21, 2014

ttc graffitiWhen a photo of a heavily graffiti tagged Toronto subway train was posted to Reddit on Sunday, it came as something of a surprise to the TTC. Since David Gunn's tenure as general manager in the late 1990s, the transit provider has had a strict policy of keeping heavily vandalized trains out of sight.

"It's a bit of the broken window theory," says TTC spokesman Brad Ross. "We will take trains out of service, or buses, or streetcars if it has been significantly vandalized, and the reason for that is we don't want it to become viral."

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City

5 things Toronto could learn from Stockholm

Posted by Chris Bateman / October 21, 2014

toronto stockholmSpread across fourteen islands close to the western shore of the Baltic Sea, Sweden's capital city is an economic powerhouse. The metropolitan area of some 2.2 million people (slightly fewer than Toronto) is responsible for roughly a third of the entire country's gross domestic product.

True to Swedish form, the Stockholm Metro, which opened a few years before Toronto's subway, is an architectural dream. Caverns of painted exposed rock, sculptures, and permanent art installations make the system a pleasure to explore, as well as ride. On the surface, a successful and increasingly popular congestion pricing scheme has quelled traffic and locals are allowed to enjoy a beer in many of the city's parks and gardens, despite the country maintaining liquor laws similar to those in Ontario.

Here are 5 things Toronto could learn from Stockholm.

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