nawlins toronto

Jazz bar closes after 25 years in Toronto

Toronto's tourist destination for jambalaya and New Orleans jazz has closed for good. 

After 25 years on King West's restaurant row, N'Awlins announced that it has closed its door to guests and musicians permanently. 

"The current situation surrounding the pandemic, including the regulations for restaurants and live music make it impossible to maintain our quality, standards, and spirit," said the restaurant in a social media post.

"Which is why it is so difficult to say goodbye." 

A landmark of Toronto's Entertainment District, N'Awlins served up Louisiana-style eats to a backdrop of nightly live music from visiting acts and the N'Awlins All Star Jazz Band (who've been playing live from home since the pandemic started). 

It was an especially popular spot for jazz lovers, diners during events such as Winterlicious, and movie-goers during the TIFF season. Now it looks like you'll have to travel down to New Orleans (when the pandemic is over) to celebrate Mardi Gras. 

"While our door on King Street may be closed for now, our passion to serve and entertain you lives on. So we are looking to brighter days where we can be together again, listen to music and eat to our heart’s content." 

"Until we meet again, stay safe, healthy and be kind to each other, so we may weather this storm and reunite for some Oscar Peterson and a Sazerac." 

Lead photo by

N'Awlins


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