Radiohead stage collapse

Inquiry into Radiohead stage collapse finally kicks off in Toronto

An inquest into the stage collapse that killed Radiohead drum technician Scott Johnson at Toronto's Downsview Park in 2012 is finally set to proceed this week after nearly seven years of anger, confusion and disappointment over an apparent lack of action.

"The people who should be held accountable are still not being held accountable," said the British band's frontman, Thom Yorke, last summer during a concert at Scotiabank Arena—the band's first show in Toronto since 2012's fatal stage collapse.

"The silence is fucking deafening."

Yorke was referring to the breakdown of a case that saw Ontario's Ministry of Labour lay 13 charges against Live Nation, Optex Staging and Services, and engineer Domenic Cugliari in connection with 33-year-old Johnson's death on June 16, 2012.

All 13 of those charges, brought forward as the result of year-long Ministry of Labour investigation, were stayed in September of 2017 when Ontario Court of Justice judge Ann Nelson ruled that there had been too many delays for the case to continue to trial.

Johnson's family and friends have been waiting for answers ever since.

Today, the process of figuring out why the young man was killed (and how to prevent something similar from happening in the future) moves forward once again with a coroner's inquest.

Roughly 25 witnesses are expected to appear before a jury over the next three weeks as part of the inquest, according to the Canadian Press, which notes that the process will "examine the circumstances around Johnson's death, but will not assign blame."

Radiohead drummer Philip Selway and Scott's father, Ken Johnson, are currently in Toronto for the inquest, which started this morning around 9 a.m.

Lead photo by

syfractal


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in Music

Toronto rapper criticized for filming music video atop war memorial

Even virtual concerts are now banned under Ontario lockdown rules

Toronto record store permanently closing and people in the city are heartbroken

The time Toronto held a rock concert for 500k people after the SARS epidemic

Live music came back to Toronto over the weekend and it was glorious

Toronto drive-in theatre reopening in nightclub parking lot this spring

Closed concert venue in Toronto on the hook for $45k a month in rent

This weekend walking tour of old Yonge Street uncovers its lost music venues