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roger waters toronto

Roger Waters takes on Trump in concert at the ACC

English rocker Roger Waters (of Pink Floyd fame) kicked off the Toronto leg of his Us + Them tour Sunday night with a powerful message aimed squarely at Donald Trump.

And he did it without ever actually saying the U.S. president's name.

“What a charade you are.” #trumpisapig #rogerwaters #usandthem #concert #live #music #livemusic #yyz #toronto

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Waters, who named his tour after a track from Pink Floyd's 1974 album The Dark Side of the Moon, took the stage for almost two-and-a-half hours last night, thrilling fans with a mix of old stuff and new.

"The content is very secret," Waters had said previously of his show. "It'll be a mixture of stuff from my long career, stuff from my years with Pink Floyd, some new things. Probably 75% of it will be old material and 25% will be new, but it will be all connected by a general theme."

That theme appears to be related to America's current political climate, if not a critique of capitalism itself, based on what audience members saw.

The multi-sensory experience featured floating pigs with Trump's face on them, graphics of Trump's head with a baby's body, animations of Trump vomiting, images of Trump cheering for Russian President Vladimir Putin, as well as large displays of words like "RESIST" and "CHARADE."

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At one point, Waters and his band played in the dark as a string of Trump quotes filled the screens behind them.

"You know, it really doesn't matter what the media write," read one, "as long as you've got a young and beautiful piece of ass."

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Waters is scheduled to play a second show at the Air Canada Centre this evening, as well as a third Toronto show at the same venue on October 13.

Lead photo by

geepsa


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