Polaris Record Salon

Polaris Record Salon 6 explores Seeds by Hey Rosetta!

The Polaris Record Salon is just like the TV show called Classic Albums. Like the show, the salon is about listening to and discussing great albums but instead of say, Nevermind or the Dark Side of the Moon, all albums are ones voted for by a member of the 2011 Polaris Music Prize jury. That's not to say the albums are on the short list. In fact, many of them aren't. Albums covered to date include Degeneration Street by The Dears, Jonestown 2: Jimmy Go Bye Bye by D-Sisive, The Five Ghosts by Stars, Cloak and Cipher by Land of Talk and Departing by The Rural Alberta Advantage.

Taking place at the Drake Underground since February, the series just completed salon number 6 on Tuesday night where music fans gathered to celebrate Seeds by Hey Rosetta!. Host Matt Wells played the album and interviewed Tim Baker and Adam Hogan from the band.

The lyrics on the album, incidentally, were described as "not shite, but not good either" during the Q&A session which I suppose was a good enough introduction to the listening session that followed. It was a sort of odd experience to not have the band play (given two of the members were present) but I suppose everyone needs a night off, right?

Stay tuned to the Polaris Record Salon page for announcements about future salons. Below are videos from the first three.

Polaris Record Salon #1: The Deers

Polaris Record Salon #2: D-Sisive

Polaris Record Salon #3: Land of Talk


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