Kids on TV rock Tranzac this weekend to help support at risk youth through Sketch

What Better Reason do you need?

Without a doubt, it's going to be a hot weekend for music in Toronto. There's that one certain music festival that everyone's talking about, but there's also something else you should be aware of - the Better Reasons Festival at the Tranzac (292 Brunswick); a very cool fund-raiser for a very cool cause.

The three-day pay-what-you-can event will raise money for Sketch, a Toronto-based group that creates art making opportunities for street-involved, homeless, and at risk youth.

Each night will be hosted in conjunction with a different local record label. Friday night, Out of this Spark present Forest City Lovers, The Magic and Evening Hymns. Doors open at 8PM.

Saturday is presented by Fuzzy Logic Recordings, and featured talent will be Lily Frost, Prairie Cat with backing band The Bicycles, Scraps from Boil Street (Puppet Shorts by Juliann Wilding and Henry Fletcher) and Peter Project. Doors at 8 again.

Sunday kicks off a little earlier at 5 PM as Blocks Recording Club presents Kids on TV, Nif-D, The Phonemes, Tradition and Matias Rozenberg. As an added treat, there'll also be a barbecue, which also kicks off at 5.

While at the festival, be sure to check out the artwork. In keeping with the spirit of the event, the Tranzac with be exhibiting the work of young people involved with Sketch.

Related links:

Photo of Kids on TV by David Waldman


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