Think About Life

Think About Life w/The Blankket & The Cause Co-Motion -- REVIEW

They're a band I choose to not stop talking about: Think About Life. The Montreal band made their way down the 401 to visit Toronto with Brooklyn's The Cause Co-Motion and Toronto's best back-up to Bruce Springsteen, The Blankket.

The show took place on a fairly chill Saturday at a narrow, but interesting spot in the heart of the Portugese Village on Dundas West called The Press Club (850 Dundas West). Bands play at the front of the place where a huge pane of class sits as a wall for passer-bys to peer through. Along with the Art-Deco feel of the place, The Press Club has a great beer selection to choose from, especially a cheery-tasting beer which I'm sure would aggravate your old-school beer-drinker. However, you can't go wrong with the other non-fruit-flavoured beers. Oh, no.

Ok. Onto the show:

The Cause Co-Motion

As people were walking in late, the door people were turning unfortunates away. The word was to get there early. Those who did were rewarded with fun, fun times. The Cause Co-Motion opened up the night with barely any space between them and the crowd. No complaints came of this as this accommodation was, more or less, the idea of the evening. The Cause Co-Motion play a brand of Classic Rock mixed in the Brooklyn rock-scene and some big beat. The songs are short, but in a fun way. Fun how? Fun as in someone saying, "there's no reason why you shouldn't be moving!" A fun warm-up band they were, but the next act was even better.

The Blankket

The Blankket, also known as Steven Kado, loves Bruce Springsteen. I once worked a show he headlined at the (Rogers Centre), serving beer for 4 amazing hours. So, what would happen if someone created their own cover songs for The Boss and sang over them in their own entertaining way? A face full of rice and a lot of happy observers (check the photos for details). Kado invited Owen Pallet (Final Fantasy) up to the front to smear Vaseline on his face and partake in the covering of rice. Kado sprawled, plunged into the crowd and shouted out his favourite Boss tunes. A crowd-pleaser is when he sings his version of "I'm On Fire'. If you don't mind the screams, then you'll love The Blankket's attempt at being The Boss. Also, if you don't see Kado sweating by the end of his set, then you know it hasn't been one of his best. He always puts on a great show, but it's not like he has to sweat to do it.

Think About Life

Think About Life, my favourite band of 2006, crammed themselves into the corner of the narrow room. Thanking certain people before the set began, I was being as patient as I could be since I had to miss their last big show during Pop Montreal. The set began with three new songs. As far as I could tell, I was the only one busting a move. After those songs were finished, the crowd began to get into it. Think About Life's Disco-House/Thrash Pop is, without-a-doubt, explosive. When the familiar songs kicked in, so did the crowd. Those who couldn't handle the rowdiness near the front and middle created a space on the cusp of the moving dancers and 'pitters. Some stood on the seats and couches - away from the sweat and proximity of crazy dancers. Although some of the band was not 100%, they put on a strong show for everyone. Fro what I heard, they won over some new fans.

Think About Life will be back on February 10th for The Wavelength Anniversary Party (Feb. 8-11) which will be held at different venues across the city.

Photos:
suckingalemon
Jason Trill
Me


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