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The Quest for the Perfect Cut

After my last visit to my usual salon, which shall remain nameless, where I received a botched colour and hack job cut I slunk into the corner to lick my cosmetic wounds with a severe case of haircut withdrawal. It would be six months before I emerged, scruffy and rife with split ends in search of a new salon.

My hair is the only cosmetic luxury I am willing to spend good money on. As such the prospect of having to decide where to go in search of the perfect cut is always daunting. How do you decide which salon will best suit your needs and budget when you have never been and there are hundreds to choose from?

This time I decided to let my (rather lean) wallet do the deciding. After seeing an ad in one of Toronto's print weeklies for the Vidal Sassoon Salon and School I decided to give them a call. The ad touted a "fantastic haircut for just $23". The price was right but unfortunately when I called I was told that they were booked solid for the next few weeks and I was instead referred to their apprentice line.

The thought of having the fate of my appearance in the hands of a mere apprentice was met with a fair amount of trepidation. I mean this is my hair. I have to walk around with this stuff on my head all day, every day! But as it turns out my fears were completely unfounded.

I must admit when I first walked into the Avenue Road salon and school I was nervous. I overheard the receptionists throwing about the names of certain celebrities quite casually and I thought for a moment I might be out of my league. I was referred to an apprentice by the name of Matthew and I was pleased to find out my first visit with him was completely free of charge. When I sat down in the chair and explained that I wanted a graduated bob with no layers and slight side swept bangs I became more nervous but my nerves were quickly soothed as I watched Matthew go about his work.

Students at the salon and school are trained from scratch. To become a full fledged stylist in the salon the students must train under more experienced stylists for two years. When students have completed their apprenticeship successfully they are offered a position at the salon and school so getting a foot in the door is quite competitive.

The cut took longer than the average salon visit. I arrived at 2:30pm and was out the door by 5:30pm but it was worth every minute. Matthew was pleasant and asked my opinion frequently during the process. When the cut was done my newly shorn tresses were examined by one of the more experienced stylists and a few finishing touches were made.

I am thrilled to report that I now have the haircut I always wanted! I could not have asked for anything better. In my three or so years of visiting other professional salons this cut takes the cake.

Cuts and colour at the Vidal Sassoon Educational Center are available Monday through Friday by appointment only. You can opt for a cut with a student right up to the senior stylists but I would certainly recommend asking for the apprentice line.

A big thanks to Matthew for his time and effort! Matthew is currently seeking a model for his upcoming test. If you have at least chin length hair without layers and are looking specifically for a graduated bob style cut give him a call. The cut will be completely free of charge, of course. The test is on Monday July 4th so call and make an appointment for a consultation as soon as possible.

Vidal Sassoon Salon and School
37 Avenue Road, York Square
416 920 1333


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