queens cross food hall toronto

A Toronto mall is getting a massive food hall with 10 new concepts

Toronto is crazy for food halls, and we're due to get a massive new one with 10 vendors at one of our most high-traffic malls.

Signs are now up for Queen's Cross Food Hall at the Eaton Centre, which are emblazoned with the logo for Oliver & Bonacini (Canoe, Rabbit Hole).

The signs also advertise 10 new concepts that should be coming to the hall: Le Petit Cornichon, Captain Neon Sushi + Bowls, Curryosity, Gil's Fish and Chipperie, Red Sauce, Swanky Burger, Lala's Cantina, Underground Sandwich, Beauty's Fried Chicken and Cross Bar.

The sign also indicates the space will be designed by Solid Design Creative, responsible for the design at places like Baro and Maison Selby.

Eaton Centre leasing plans reveal that the hall will span almost 18,000 square feet.

Queens cross toronto

The ground floor space where Queen's Cross Food Hall is slated to open (right behind the curtains) close to the Queen subway station.

It's good news for anyone who's been missing Richtree Market on Level One of the mall, as this new food hall will be taking its place near the entrance to the Queen subway station.

Retail Insider also reports that Oliver & Bonacini is planning on opening another restaurant at Eaton Centre that should be called Constance Taverne.

The signage says the Queen's Cross Food Hall should be opening late summer 2023.

Photos by

Fareen Karim


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