kyky cookies

Doug Ford's daughter is doing pop-ups at her new Toronto cookie shop

Doug Ford's daughter is pressing on with opening her cookie shop with pop-ups at the new storefront, despite criticism that necessitated a name change for her brand.

KyKy's Cookies and Ice Cream will soon be opening at 195 Norseman St., and the brand created by Kyla Ford has been teasing pop-ups happening soon on their social media.

The shop formerly operated solely online, and now is opening a physical location with items they've never sold before, like ice cream. Their bread and butter, so to speak, has been massive heaping cookies stuffed with lots of sweet fillings. 

For the pop-ups, they'll be doing walk-ins on the weekends with a special menu of never-before-seen storefront specialties.

If an Instagram post announcing the pop-ups is anything to judge by, anyone who wants to check it out can possibly expect creations like a new Ice Cream Sundae cookie with an entire sugar cone on top.

Despite the backlash KyKy's got for the horrible acronym their previous name spelled out, the announcement post has racked up over 900 likes on Instagram, with people commenting things like "This is so exciting," "Yes yes yes," "Hurray," "Can't wait" and "I will be there."

The official dates for pop-ups and the store's opening are still yet to be announced.

Lead photo by

KyKy's Cookies and Ice Cream


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