st lawrence market toronto

St. Lawrence Market might start opening on more days of the week

Drop by St. Lawrence Market on a Saturday and you'll find a bustling mecca of  vendors. But, head there on a Sunday and it's dead quiet. 

That's because Toronto's favourite public market is only open five days a week—Sundays and Mondays not included—which is tough for anyone who works a 9 to 5 during the week and only has one day to visit Front Street. 

That might soon change, depending on how consultations with the City and the public go next week. 

The City is holding a review of St. Lawrence Market South's hours of operation "with the objective of optimizing the hours to better support the Toronto and Market community".

Technically, that could mean either extending or shortening the hours, but let's be real—what better Sunday activity is there than browsing cheese? 

The South Market is the area that holds more than 120 vendors, many which are family-owned, and have been around since the 1970s. 

Right now, its hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. from Tuesday to Thursday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Friday. On Saturdays, it opens alongside the Farmers' Market from 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

The only thing open on Sunday is the antique market, which runs from dawn until 5 p.m. 

 The public consultation will take place on October 2, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., at the Temporary North Market.

Lead photo by

St. Lawrence Market


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in Eat & Drink

How pudding that looks like ramen became Toronto's newest food craving

Toronto is getting an outdoor pumpkin patch with food and drinks next month

Brewery that supports clean drinking water opening in Toronto

Toronto's prettiest brunch spot has officially closed and this is what's taking its place

Toronto is getting its first location of a popular all-day breakfast restaurant

Toronto's beloved cookbook store that closed in 2018 has surprisingly reopened

Doug Ford is promoting Tim Hortons again and people have thoughts

Markham is getting the first Canadian location of a 100-year-old noodle chain