loblaws price fixing

You can now register for free groceries at Loblaws

As promised, Loblaw Companies Ltd. is now allowing customers to register for a $25 gift card after admitting to its participation in a nearly 15-year-long, industry-wide, bread price-fixing arrangement.

"Loblaw discovered that Canadians were overcharged for the cost of some packaged bread products in our stores and other grocery stores across Canada," reads the company's newly-launched loblawcard.ca microsite.

"In response, we're offering eligible customers a $25 Loblaw Card," it reads, "which can be used to purchase items sold in our grocery stores across Canada."

The gift card program, which opened for registration today, is available to any Canadian who purchased pretty much any packaged bread product from any of the company's stores between 2002 and 2015.

Basically, if you think you bought bread from Loblaws, No Frills, Real Canadian Superstore or any of the corporation's other 20+ grocery brands before 2015, you can register for free groceries right now.

Many Canadians have already vowed to donate their cards to local food banks or other charities.

All you need to do to is declare that you purchased an eligible bread product in the specified time frame and that you're the age of majority in your province.

Loblaw, which is Canada's largest retailer, expects three million to six million customers to redeem the offer.

Lead photo by

Loblaws


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