ttc attack

TTC employees attacked by up to 15 youths aboard Toronto bus

Police have reported yet another violent attack aboard a Toronto public transit vehicle Monday evening — this one allleged to have been caried out by a group of roughly one dozen minors against two TTC workers.

The Toronto Police Service issued an alert via Twitter just before 5 p.m. on Monday, reporting that "a group of 10-15 youths attacked 3 uniformed TTC employees on a bus" in the area of Kennedy Road and Merrian Road in Scarborough.

Police later clarified that the disturbing incident, which took place around 3:35 p.m. on Monday, involved the assault of two Toronto Transit Commission employees.

Police say that the youths in question fled the area following the attack, at which point police and TTC Special Constables attended the scene.

Fortunately, injuries sustained by the employees who were assaulted are said to be non-life-threatening. Anyone with information is asked to contact 41 Division of the Toronto Police Service at 416-808-4100.

"Toronto Police are investigating the despicable swarming/assault of two on-duty TTC employees this afternoon," wrote the transit commission in a statement just after 5:30 p.m.

"We will, as always, give police our full co-operation and any video we have. Attacks on transit employees are covered under a special provision of the Criminal Code."

Lead photo by

Stephen Gardiner


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