flies ontario

Horrific masses of flies overtake Ontario but not seeing them would be concerning

Horrific writhing masses of gross flies have been spotted in Ontario, but not seeing them in summer would actually be a cause for concern.

Fish flies, also called shadflies or mayflies, swarm Ontario towns in summertime, mobbing cars and sidewalks and are difficult to deter even with a leafblower at full blast.

Though species of mayflies exist worldwide, there's nothing like the specific fear of these aquatic insects coating vehicles and garage doors, which continues to traumatize kids in Ontario.

Attracted to light in the dark, they typically swarm lakeside towns, and can be especially prominent for a period of a few weeks, usually around June.

They're attracted to light in the dark which has even led some people to try to take matters into their own hands by disabling public street lights.

Though they cling to absolutely everything in the creepiest way, not seeing them would actually be a cause for concern as they're a sign of healthy lakes. Lots of mayflies are a sign of a healthy ecosystem, and are a protein source for fish and birds. 

They emerge from the lakes and are attracted to lakeside communities mainly by lights. Though they may be annoying and kind of freaky in their large numbers, they're totally harmless, and only have a lifespan of a couple days.

Lead photo by

Flickr


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