GlobalMedic

Toronto charity is sending emergency kits to people in need all around the world

A charity in Toronto is doing what it can to help people in need all over the world by providing emergency kits filled with hygiene essentials, a way to get clean water, and much more. 

GlobalMedic, located at 35 Coronet Road in Etobicoke, works to build family emergency kits as well as emergency food kits that they send to countries where people have been impacted by various different disasters. 

"We want to get the right aid, to the right people, at the right time," executive director Rahul Singh told blogTO. 

"You don't want to send people junk."

For that reason, Singh says they take an evidence-based approach when it comes to assembling the kits.

"The first thing we do is we look and see what people need and we know from experience that usually when people are fleeing war or effected by an earthquake or a storm, they need access to clean drinking water. It's crucial," Singh explained. 

As a result, an important part of their kits is a water purification unit which is composed of two buckets on top of one another with a ceramic filter - which is made in Toronto - inside.

toronto charity emergency kits

The water purification units via Global Medic.

"The idea is that mom or dad are able to pour dirty water in through the top bucket, gravity pulls it through the filter, and stores the clean water in the bottom bucket which means no bugs can get in," Singh explained, adding that they are able to produce them for under $20. 

Assuming that people have consumed dirty water, Singh said that the next step is adding oral rehydration sachets. 

"Assuming you drank dirty water, you're probably going to get sick and your kids are going to get sick. If your kids get sick, it means they have diarrhea and they're going to have what's called an electrolyte imbalance," he said. 

toronto charity emergency kits

The water purification unit in use.

"We know with the kit you're going to have clean water so you're going to be able to mix this in with the clean water and restore electrolytes back into the patients."

Besides all of this, the kits include soap, toothbrushes, toothpaste, and other hygiene products, as well as a solar light. When all is said and done, these kits cost under $40.

"We air freight it over, our teams there take it off the airplane, hand it directly to a family and help them assemble it."

Singh said that GlobalMedic works in 75 different countries including Paraguay, Somalia and Colombia.

They are currently on their 225th mission in the Philippines where already they've donated 500 family emergency kits as they currently deal with the aftermath of typhoons.

Of course, the charity is also doing work right here in Toronto by helping vulnerable residents access soap and mask kits. 

"Six days a week we pack aide," Singh said. 

Photos by

Global Medic


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