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Blood soaked laundry scattered outside Union Station in Toronto

If you were anywhere near Toronto's Union Station on Tuesday afternoon, you may have noticed some blood-stained laundry scattered in front of the building.

The bloodied clothes were part of an art installation organized by Armenian youth in the city to bring attention and awareness to war crimes committed by Turkey and Azerbaijan in Artsakh, a state in the South Caucasus that is internationally recognized as a part of Azerbaijan.

Those who were part of the installation stood among the blood-soaked clothes in silence holding signs and images that depicted the violence occurring in Artsakh. 

"Hospitals are being bombed," one sign read, while others dubbed the current conflict the Armenian genocide of 2020. Some simply asked for recognition for Artsakh.

The art installation comes as, over the past three weeks, numerous villages were destroyed and casualties were reported on both sides.

While a ceasefire was announced on Saturday, both Armenian and Azerbaijani forces blamed one another for repeated violations. 

Earlier this month, Canada suspended the export of military drone technology to Turkey — which has backed Azerbaijan in the conflict — after allegations that Canadian-made drones were being used surfaced.

Lead photo by

Lana


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