meal and march for housing

Hundreds march in Toronto to demand affordable housing and support for homeless

Hundreds of activists and advocates marched through downtown Toronto yesterday calling for more affordable housing as well as a commitment from the city to support those experiencing homelessness this upcoming winter. 

The event, organized by the Encampment Support Network (ESN), included a meal served to those experiencing homelessness at Moss Park as well as a march, music, art and speakers such as well-known activist Desmond Cole. 

Members of ESN have been working tirelessly to provide basic supports to those living in encampments for the past 14 weeks, including food, water and sleeping bags, but the group says with winter on the horizon and no end in sight for the pandemic, people need permanent housing now more than ever before.

To help get this message across, Wednesday's protest included performance art that projected the words "This should be housing" and "The housing crisis is a real estate game" on the side of empty buildings — many of which are owned by WE Charity. 

Advocates say these buildings should be immediately expropriated and transformed into affordable housing.

The group also has six immediate demands they say the city must consider to protect the health and safety of the precariously housed as winter approaches:

  1. Invest in actual affordable housing, obtain vacant buildings to turn into housing and create 10,000 units of rent-geared-to-income housing over the next 24 months
  2. Immediately enforce an eviction moratorium
  3. Immediately end the criminalization of encampments and issue a moratorium on clearing encampments
  4. Introduce robust overdose prevention and harm reduction services in all shelters and supportive housing sites
  5. Immediately ensure there is enough emergency shelter space until there is sufficient affordable housing (2,000 more rooms before winter)
  6. Immediately provide winter survival gear for those in encampments

Toronto's homelessness and housing crisis has become increasingly obvious over the past several months as the pandemic has pushed many out of the shelter system and into encampments. 

"Encampments are peoples' emergency option — whether it's a response to the housing crisis, the COVID crisis or the OD crisis — encampments are peoples' only options," ESN told blogTO earlier this month.

"The shelter system was already full before COVID-19. In order to respect physical distancing, most shelters had to reduce capacity, so people were pushed out of the system... but there have always been encampments, even before COVID-19."

The city, meanwhile, has not yet announced a set winter strategy for the homeless.

They have been working to move residents into the shelter-hotels established during the pandemic for several months, some of which will remain open until at least April, but many still prefer to live outside rather than in a shelter due to safety concerns, hostile neighbourhoods and a lack of independence.

The city also recently recommended a plan to build 3,000 affordable rental and supportive homes over the next 24 months, and the federal government later announced a plan to provide $1.2 billion to cities across Canada for modular homes.

But ESN says if we want to prevent those without housing from freezing to death this winter, immediate action is required.

"We watch our friends and neighbours go without shelter, food, and water, be targeted by police, be criminalized and die," the group says. "People need permanent housing in their communities, now."

Lead photo by

Toronto Communists 


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in City

Snow is falling in Ontario and creeping closer to Toronto

The TTC is giving Donlands Station a major makeover

Toronto warned of scammers sending fake electricity bills and e-Transfers

Jason Momoa gets motorcycle delivery in Toronto

A Toronto carpenter is building insulated mini-shelters for homeless people

Toronto might start to toll the Don Valley Parkway and Gardiner Expressway

Ontario teen charged $880 after throwing 50-person house party

Map shows where to get a flu shot in Toronto