covid 19 cases toronto

Toronto still isn't seeing a steady decrease in new COVID-19 cases

The situation in Toronto is improving, no doubt, but according to the city's top health official, the numbers for COVID-19 just aren't decreasing steadily enough for things to go back to how they used to be. 

Despite a sense of slow-returning normalcy, Toronto's Medical Officer of Health Dr. Eileen de Villa stated in today's daily briefing that the city has yet to see a steady decrease in daily new cases, or new hospitalizations. 

According to De Villa, "COVID-19 activity is slowing down in our city", but things aren't expected to return back to normal until infections and hospital admissions see a steady decline. 

"We are still in a deadly pivotal showdown with this virus," said Mayor John Tory at the briefing. 

Last Tuesday saw a disappointing and drastic uptick in cases after three straight days of declining numbers, with 525 new cases across the province, up from 437 the day before. 

Today's new Ontario numbers saw a 2.2 per cent increase from yesterday, up to 387 from 370, though Monday's was the lowest number of new cases in the last four weeks.

De Villa stated today that there are currently 6,448 infection cases in Toronto, including 5,809 confirmed cases and 639 probable ones.

There are currently 105 people in intensive care units, with the virus disproportionately affecting recent immigrants and those living in lower-income areas and neighbourhoods with higher unemployment rates. 

To date, 469 people have died of COVID-19 in Toronto. 

Jurisdictions across Canada are responding differently to COVID-19, with areas like British Columbia reporting a sustained decrease in the number of new cases, while Quebec continues to be the hardest-hit province in the country. 

With the weather getting better, it's been harder for Torontonians to stay home, although Mayor Tory said that fewer tickets have been issued, which implies we're getting better at adhering to social distancing bylaws. 

Still, there's been no official date for public parks to re-open. 

"I know it is not reasonable to ask people to stay inside, especially now that the nice weather is upon us," said De Villa. "However, physical distancing will continue to be a part of our lives for the foreseeable future." 

"We need to ensure that we do not undo the progress we have made with our physical distancing measures." 

Lead photo by

UHN


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