coronavirus death

Ontario reports 51 new COVID-19 deaths in highest one-day leap for the second day in a row

Public Health Ontario has confirmed 51 new COVID-19 related deaths in the province, marking the second day in a row that the death toll has reached a new record. 

According to the province's daily Epidemiologic Summary, a total of 385 deaths have been reported in Ontario between January 15 and April 14 — it also notes that there may be a reporting delay for deaths in the integrated Public Health Information System (iPHIS). 

The province is also reporting 494 new coronavirus cases — a 6.2 per cent increase from the previous report released yesterday. There are now a total of 8,447 COVID-19 cases confirmed in Ontario, though this is likely not the full picture due to limited testing.

Of the total cases, 3,902 are considered to be resolved and the rate of recovery is 46.2 per cent.

Meanwhile, 795 patients are currently hospitalized with the virus, 254 are in ICU and 188 are currently on a ventilator.

To date, Ontario has completed 119,092 coronavirus tests and a growing backlog now includes 4,429 potential cases currently under investigation.

On Tuesday, Ontario completed a total of 6,010 tests — a significantly smaller number than the 13,000 tests per day Premier Doug Ford says the province is capable of, but an improvement from previous days.

Public Health Units in the Greater Toronto Area currently account for 55 per cent of cases, and 40.9 per cent of patients are 60 years of age and older. 

The province has also confirmed that 98 outbreaks have been reported in long-term care homes.

Though the numbers may currently seem grim, public health officials offered a slightly more positive outlook earlier this week.

Ontario's associate chief medical officer of health, Barbara Yaffe, said Monday afternoon that —  based on predictive modelling projections released earlier this month —  the province is expected to peak this week in terms of the number of cases as long as all measures in place continue.

"I think, if they're in fact correct and things continue, after a peak usually things go down," she said. "So that does give me a glimmer of hope but with some caution built in."

Lead photo by

Francisco Àvia_Hospital Clínic de Barcelona


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