ttc fare evasion

People really hate the fare evasion ads on the TTC

The TTC may have lost over $70 million to fare evasion last year alone, but Toronto residents are less than impressed with the multiple measures — many of which place blame on transit users — being take to combat the issue.

The transit agency has promised to bring in even more fare inspectors to enforce the rules, though a recent violent outburst caused many to question their efficacy.

And the news that some of them would be allowed to be disguised in plain clothes wasn't particularly well-received, either. 

The TTC has also emphasized the need for a "a culture shift towards fare compliance and a reset of social norms" in their revenue protection strategy, part of which would come from "communications campaigns to promote a positive customer culture and 'tap every time' behaviour."

But the TTC already released a fare evasion ad campaign months ago, and it's safe to say commuters absolutely hate it. 

"In case the TTC was wondering, the new fare evasion ads are making me want to evade the fare even more," one Twitter user wrote online

"TTC is probably losing more money making those 'fare evasion' ads than actual fare evasion itself," another wrote.   

Many feel the TTC's ads will only make the problem worse. 

And others are saying the money spent on the ads could surely be put to better use. 

Some transit users are wondering if the TTC understands that many fare evaders simply cannot afford to pay.

"I hate seeing those 'fare evasion' ads on the TTC," one social media user said.

"I used to be poor. The $150 or so I spend on the TTC per month is no big deal to me now, but when I was poor I often didn't even have the $3. These assholes think people evade fares for fun?!"

And transit users aren't the only one speaking out against the TTC's approach. 

 A recently released statement from the TTC workers' union indicates that many of the transit agency's employees are also not on board with the TTC's punitive measures to address fare evasion.

Lead photo by

Unpaid Transit Influencer


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