jordan boswell ndp

Brampton NDP candidate under fire for derogatory comments about an Indigenous woman

The NDP has some explaining to do after derogatory comments from a Brampton candidate surfaced online yesterday. 

Jordan Boswell is the NDP candidate in Brampton Centre, and he apologized on Twitter yesterday for a comment he made at the expense of an Indigenous woman back in 2012. 

About six years ago, Boswell tweeted a photo of a story on the cover of a newspaper about sex trafficking in a group home for teenage girls. 

The front page blurb includes a photo of an Indigenous woman who was a former teenage prostitute and reads, "Former teenage prostitute says more can be done to help vulnerable girls avoid life in the sex trade."

Along with the photo of the story, Boswell wrote "Geez they're really letting everyone into that business these days #gottagetmesomeofthat #shejustmissedbeingpretty."

"I deeply regret the hurtful and wrong comment I made on social media. I understand this type of language is offensive and harmful. I apologize unequivocally," Boswell wrote on Twitter last night.

Many Canadians are absolutely outraged by the comment, and they're saying his short, three-sentence apology is far from enough. 

Many are pointing out that the apology doesn't include details about what Boswell has done or is doing to change, educate himself and hold himself accountable. 

And others are saying no apology could make up for the deeply offensive statement.

Many are simply calling for his resignation, saying these views have no place in politics. 

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh and Boswell are set to campaign together in Brampton today. Singh has yet to make a comment about the scandal, but some are saying he must apologize or even turf Boswell entirely. 

The federal election is less than a week away, and already a fairly large number of candidates have been pushed to resign after getting caught up in controversy. 

As of now, Boswell has not announced any plans to resign. 

Lead photo by

Jordan Boswell


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