queen john toronto

This Toronto intersection is a total pedestrian nightmare

If you've walked near Queen and John lately, you've probably noticed it's an absolute mess. 

The crosswalk is currently entirely fenced off and there are "DANGER DUE TO OPEN EXCAVATION" signs all over.

If you do want to cross the incredibly busy intersection, you'll have to walk quite a bit out of your way and cross a makeshift bridge. 

queen john torontoThe construction is all part of the John Street Corridor Improvements project which aims to transform John Street into a “cultural corridor” and pedestrian priority route. 

The planned improvements include widening sidewalks and boulevards, greening the street by planting additional trees, installing new paving materials in the roadway and on the sidewalks to add visual interest and calm traffic, adding new roadway, pedestrian, event and traffic lighting and more.

queen john torontoPhase two of the project is currently underway  — and that includes rebuilding aging underground infrastructure, building new cable chambers, installing ductbanks and replacing cables needed for civil construction, and building infrastructure for other utilities and lighting. 

The present work is being done by Toronto Hydro’s contractor Entera, and according to the city they're making every effort to reduce the impact of the work on pedestrians. 

Phase one began in May of 2018, the second phase is set to be complete by 2020, but the overall project is expected to be ongoing until the summer of 2023.

queen john toronto

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