airline passenger protection

Airline passengers are finally being compensated for flight delays in Canada

After months of consultations, Canada’s Air Passenger Protection Regulations were finally announced today. Passengers now have the rights to compensation and clear communication when a flight is delayed or cancelled.

Passengers who are bumped off of a flight will retain $2,400 in compensation.

Those who are delayed on the tarmac are guaranteed access to washrooms, proper ventilation, food, drink and a way to communicate with people outside of the plane. If the plane is delayed for over three hours, passengers can disembark, unless this is not possible for safety or security reasons. 

If an airline loses or damages baggage, the passenger is entitled to $2,100 in compensation.

These updated regulations apply to any flight leaving from Canada or travelling within the country, which includes connecting flights.

Smaller airlines will pay less for these compensations than bigger airlines that service two million passengers or more.

These new regulations have provoked controversy. On one side of the discussion, the International Air Transport Association said these new rules violate international agreements and Canada does not have the authority to mandate such regulations.

The association is asking the federal court to overturn the updates. At the moment, if air carriers fail to follow these regulations, they will face fines.

On the other side of the debate, passenger rights experts say that these regulations do not account for people with disabilities who cannot sit on the tarmac for extended periods of time.

This is just phase one of the updated passenger protection regulations. On December 15, more provisions will be announced, including compensation for delays and cancellations.

Lead photo by

Sean Smith


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