Pearson plane crash

Plane and fuel truck collide at Toronto's Pearson Airport

Five people were injured and an entire Air Canada Jazz plane is "pretty much written off" this morning after a jarring, and potentially deadly runway collision at Toronto's Pearson International Airport.

Peel Regional Police say that a passenger plane with 51 people aboard was hit by a fuel tanker truck on the runway at Pearson while taxiing to a gate in Terminal 1 shortly after 1:30 a.m. on Friday.

The plane had departed from Toronto for Sudbury earlier in the evening, but was forced to turn back due to poor weather conditions.

Upon its return to Toronto, the Air Canada Jazz aircraft "came into contact with a Menzies fuel truck," according to Pearson. Police say that the tanker truck hit the plane, spun it around, and hit it in three more places. 

All passengers and crew were assessed at the scene and evacuated to Terminal 1. The flight's pilot, co-pilot, one flight attendant and two passengers were treated for injuries. At least three were reportedly taken to hospital.

The plane is said to have sustained "significant damage," while the driver of the Menzies truck was charged with dangerous operation of a motor vehicle.

"The aircraft and vehicle have been removed and the scene has returned to normal operations," said the Greater Toronto Airports Authority in a statement. "There is no operational impact at the airport."

Lead photo by

Bill Dwyer


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