teddy bear toronto

Someone is leaving a giant teddy bear around Toronto

You've probably seen Paddington Bear, The Berenstain bears and even Winnie the Pooh, but have you spotted the newest fluffy friend to hit the scene? Toronto's travelling bear is being spotted all over the place.

No, this isn't a grizzly that's escaped from the zoo. This giant stuffed bear has been taking the streets by storm as he moves from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

This nearly life-size tan teddy has been seen on streets across the city - from Parkdale to Queen West.

This big guy has two red hearts stamped on its back paws and has become a bit of a social media celebrity.

Often slumped on the sidewalk or against a telephone pole, this bear might be hitting Toronto's bar scene a little too hard.

"That bear is drunk af," commented one Instagram user.

"Looks like he's already had his weekend," joked another.

This guy’s ready for the weekend! #parkdale #parkdalelife

A post shared by Kiran Thind (@kirancherrybomb) on

With this mysterious bear travelling all over the city, many people were wondering how it has managed to move from one place to another.

"This teddy was on my street earlier in the week," said one person on Instagram. 

Another asked, "how did this bear get there? He was hanging off a fence by my house."

While most are not exactly sure how this bear is getting around the city, one can only hope Toy Story was telling the truth: maybe toys really do come to life when no one's looking.

Lead photo by

blogTO


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