pacific mall raid

Police raid finds thousands of counterfeit items at Pacific Mall

York Regional Police are rolling in Louey Vuitton and Bugo Hoss today after executing a raid at Pacific Mall — one of the actual worst places for counterfeit goods on Earth.

The large Chinese shopping centre in Markham made headlines earlier this year after appearing on the U.S. government's annual Notorious Markets List, which names and shames chronic knockoff purveyors all around the globe.

"Sales of counterfeit goods in the Pacific Mall reportedly continue despite extensive efforts by brand owners to enforce their trademarks," wrote the United States Trade Representative in January.

"Vendors in Pacific Mall appear to operate largely with impunity, and requests for assistance from local law enforcement have reportedly gone unanswered."

It didn't take long after that report for mall management to promise a crack down on counterfeit products, many of which (eyeglasses, cosmetics, fragrances) were said to pose a possible risk to public health and safety.

Whatever Pacific Mall has done since then to combat the widespread pirating problem, it hasn't been working. Bring in the cops!

York Regional Police announced on Wednesday afternoon that investigators were currently executing search warrants at various retailers located within the Toronto area mall as part of an investigation into counterfeit goods."

"On June 27, 2018, more than 30 officers executed warrants and seized items that will now be examined by various manufacturers," reads a press release issued by YRP later on Wednesday "Items included clothes, handbags and cell phone accessories."

Police say say that "thousands of suspected counterfeit items" were found between seven kiosks at Pacific Mall. A significant quantity of both merchandise and cash were also discovered at the private residence of one kiosk owner.

No charges were laid today, according to police, but they will be executing more search warrants in storage facilities related to the Pacific Mall investigation — which itself was prompted by complaints from citizens.

If retailers are found to have known they were selling fake products to consumers, they could be subject to criminal charges with fines of up to $1 million or five years in prison.

Lead photo by

York Regional Police


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