community bicycle network toronto

Toronto's Community Bicycle Network shuts down after 24 years

Long before Toronto became a budding city of cyclists, there was the Community Bicycle Network working tirelessly to transform our streets into the far more bike-friendly ones that you see today.

Now, after 24 years of championing on behalf of cyclists, CBN is officially shutting down. A note issued today outlined the reasons for ending its tenure as one of Toronto's primary cycling advocacy collectives.

"With the success of pilot projects such as the cycle tracks of Richmond & Adelaide, the contra-flow lane on Shaw Street, the Bloor Street bike lanes... CBN can finally go to rest knowing that cycling advocacy and services are in good hands."

To some degree, it would be fair to say that the CBN is retiring because it's accomplished what it needed to. Yes, bicycling advocates will (fairly) tell you that there's lots of work left to be done, but the Toronto of 2017 is far more invested in cycling than city of 1993.

Few people recall that the first bike share program in Toronto was actually run by the CBN between 2001 and 2006. It featured around 150 bikes at its peak. Today's bike share network is obviously far more robust but credit goes to the originators.

Until 2015, the CBN occupied a space on Queen Street West that became a fixture in the neighbourhood, serving as community hub via DIY workshops and repair space.

Various initiatives like bike sharing, bike co-ops, new rules to help ensure cyclist safety, bike lanes, and most recently a huge provincial investment in cycling infrastructure have all contributed to Toronto's growing reputation as a cycling city.

The CBN will be hosting a farewell event on December 11 at La Socialite in Kensington Market to celebrate its many achievements in cycling advocacy over the years.

Lead photo by

Community Bicycle Network


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