cn tower toronto

This might be the scariest job in Toronto

It should come as no surprise that it requires a team of dedicated workers to keep the 41 year old CN Tower in good shape, and the unsung heroes who work on the architectural wonder that take the term "high maintenance" to another level.

In the photo above, crews are seen conducting a concrete inspection and making minor cosmetic repairs, which are usually done during the summer months. Still, there's a near-constant flow of work for tower staff.

Engineers, technicians, waste management, and general maintenance staff are all responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations inside and outside of the tower often using specially designed equipment to match the novel shape and height of the tower.

Even tasks that seem like odd jobs, like repainting portions tower, take on epic status given the scale of the tower. Touching up the top-most antenna, for instance, looks downright terrifying.

At 1,815.3 feet, the tower stands equivalent to a 147 storey building, far eclipsing anything in the vicinity. It was the world's tallest building from its completion in 1975 until 2007 when it was surpassed by the Burj Khalifa in Dubai.

The crew monitors all aspects of the tower through an electric system, including the rotating restaurant, glass floor, elevator, and programmed LED lights that serve as the Toronto's collective night light.

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It's thanks to the dedicated crew and their tireless efforts that the CN Tower remains an icon that represents Toronto to the rest of the world. Well, I guess Drake gets some credit too, but maintenance staff still have the best views.

Lead photo by

Bruce Reeve


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