scotiabank theatre escalators

Toronto's worst escalator is finally going to be fixed for good

Merry TIFF-mas to your legs!

After years of gracefully stepping aside to let Hollywood use our streets, theatres and restaurants each September, Toronto is finally getting something in return (ya know, on top of the millions and millions in tourism dollars.)

Cineplex has confirmed ahead of this year's Toronto International Film Festival that the Scotiabank Theatre will have operational escalators once again "within the next few days."

This means that the era of hiking up five storeys to sit down for two hours is coming to an end – and it can't come fast enough for regular patrons of the John and Richmond theatre.

The nearly 20 year old escalators have been breaking down periodically since at least 2013, forcing locals to hoof it up 75 stairs and get sweaty when they least expect it (like during movie dates — gross.)

Last year's film festival brought the escalator situation to a head, however, when international film critics and executives started griping about the steps on Twitter. A lot of them. Enough to warrant an article in The Hollywood Reporter. Enough, apparently, to make Cineplex fix the problem in time for TIFF 2017.

Metro reports that film-goers will be able to ride up and down the escalators at Scotiabank theatre by Sept. 7, at the latest. One is newly installed, while the other is still under repair.

Cineplex hopes to have the second new escalator running permanently by Spring 2018, but there won't be any construction on it during TIFF – probably to prevent the kind of outrage and mockery we saw from rich Californians last year.

Lead photo by

Jesse Milns


Latest Videos



Latest Videos


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in City

Toronto is getting a unique triangular park as a part of community revitalization

Ferris wheel at Toronto's famous 'dead mall' jams and traps riders

Toronto is growing way too fast to keep up with power demands

Feds lays out plan with aim to solve Canada's national housing crisis

Toronto creeks are being used for illegal dumping of chemicals and car parts

Popular Toronto destination becoming test hub for tiny three-wheeled cars

Creepy pinecone-shaped cocoons are invading Ontario and you should drown them

People warn of common One Fare transit mistake that could get you fined in the GTA