blue whale toronto

This giant blue whale will soon be on display in Toronto

In 2014, nine endangered blue whales died after becoming stranded in ice - a number that represents about 3 per cent of the blue whale population.

After two washed ashore in Rocky Harbour and Trout River, Newfoundland, the majestic mammals garnered international attention.

While some worried about the whales bursting, the ROM stepped in to study them and continues to research how to conserve these sea creatures.

Out of the Depths: The Blue Whale Story will open at the ROM on March 11. The exhibition will chronicle how the ROM and Research Casting International recovered the whale's skeletons and gathered further information about them.

The exhibition will feature the original blue whale skeleton recovered from Trout River, Newfoundland.

According to a ROM news release, it'll be one of biggest and most complete blue whale skeletons to be displayed in the world.

“Blue whales have captured our imagination through their sheer size and extreme adaptation to aquatic life, said Mark Engstrom, the ROM's senior curator and deputy director of collections and research in a news release.

“The chance to share the recovery story with our visitors is a once in a lifetime opportunity.”

Out of the Depths will mark the beginning of the museum's sesquicentennial programming - or programming to celebrate Canada's 150th anniversary.

Lead photo by

Jacqueline Waters


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