ttc hacks

5 TTC hacks that'll make your commute easier

It's worth knowing a few TTC hacks even if it makes your commute just a little bit better. We already know how frustrating Toronto's transit system can be, so why not take every measure possible to ensure that you have a comfortable trip?

Here are five hacks to remember the next time you're on the TTC.

Change lines at Spadina instead of St. George

Conventional logic dictates that when traveling south on Spadina then west on Line 2 (or the opposite), it's faster to change at St. George. It generally isn't. Plus, by taking the walkway you avoid what is one of the TTC's busiest stations and decrease the chance of a train delay by scraping off an extra stop.

Walk the wrong way to improve your commute

If you tend to board buses or streetcars at a busy stop (particularly one that's near a subway entrance), do yourself a favour and walk one stop in the wrong direction while waiting for your vehicle. By the time you re-arrive, it's likely that you'll get a seat while everyone else has to jam in.

Avoid boarding at Union when heading north on Line 1

Given the proximity of King and St. Andrew to Union, it's often possible to enter the subway at one of these two stations instead without going much out of the way. You then travel through Union on the train, everyone gets out, you sit down, and revel in how nice it is to have seat.

Board busy trains last at key subway stations

At the height of the morning and afternoon rush, holding out hope for a seat can be foolish. If you're boarding at a station where the doors are going to open on the other side of the train at upcoming stops, try to enter last so you can lean against the glass (not the door). This works at St. George (westbound), Yonge (eastbound), Eglinton (southbound), etc.

Get TTC service alerts sent you by email

Subscribe to My TTC e-services to get notices about service delays sent to you by email. The best part is that you can filter the alerts sent your way by day of the week, route type (streetcar vs. bus), and subway line. These alerts are quick to set up, and might save you major time one day.

Lead photo by

Steve Chui


Join the conversation Load comments

Latest in City

The West Toronto Railpath is the city's hidden urban trail next to the train tracks

32 organizations and initiatives helping frontline healthcare workers in Toronto

People are outraged after Toronto Public Health put over 100 staff on emergency leave

Toronto street now has seats made of wheelbarrows

Community rallies to replace Toronto nurse's stolen bike and now she's paying it forward

People keep warning about the dangers of the Scarborough Bluffs

Gladstone Avenue in Toronto is named after someone who supported slavery

People in Toronto keep losing sleep because of construction in the middle of the night