road closures toronto

Major road & TTC closures for this weekend in Toronto

Road closures in Toronto this Thanksgiving weekend aren't aren't event-based for the first time in recent memory. There's a little lull between Nuit Blanche and the Waterfront Marathon next week, but that doesn't mean that the city has escaped altogether.

Major construction and TTC work will still cause headaches for those travelling in certain areas.

The most significant obstacle is the shutdown of Richmond St. between Yonge and Bay streets. Given the central location of this closure, it causes a ripple effect throughout much of the eastern side of downtown.

Bay St. is also closed in the vicinity between King and Adelaide streets for the hoisting of a massive crane, so the street is basically a write-off this weekend south of Queen. Those driving to the Rogers Centre on Sunday should take note, as should anyone hitting up the Bird's Nest at city hall.

Dufferin St. is also closed south of Peel St. for Metrolinx construction work on the railway overpass, requiring those travelling through the Queen and Dufferin to jog around via Gladstone Ave.

The TTC also has a major closure this weekend as crews tackle maintenance work on the Bloor Viaduct, Line 2 will be closed between Pape and St. George Stations from October 8 to 10. Regular service will resume at the start of the day on Tuesday. It'll be shuttle buses in the interim.

For a full list of road restrictions, check out the City of Toronto's official list.


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