Six50King

Condo developer Freed defends misleading advertising

Condo marketing is a hyperbolic art that helps make all new projects look like paradise. And sometimes, incoming developments don't live up to the hype.

That's what happened at Six50King, a condo building located at King and Bathurst. Now, as CBC News reports today, Freed Developments is up against a $6.5 million lawsuit after it decided not to use Munge Leung Design Associates (now Studio Munge), even though it previously advertised that the notable interior design firm would be working on the project.

Some owners, as the Toronto Star previously reported, bought pre-construction units back in 2007 but didn't learn about Munge Leung's apparent lack of involvement until June 2014.

As the Star wrote back in April, none of the allegations against Freed have been proven in court.

According to CBC, Freed said in its statement of defence that it decided not to use Munge Leung after its Six50King brochures were already printed and that it never made any promises to include the design studio in its new development.

Freed also told CBC that new buyers had to sign agreements, which noted that the developer could make changes to the building's design.

Is it fair for condo developers to renege on their marketing promises? Let us know in the comments.


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